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Article

Death Reflection and Employee Work Behavior in the COVID-19 New Normal Time: The Role of Duty Orientation and Work Orientation

1
School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872, China
2
John von Neumann University, National Bank of Hungary, Research Center, 6000 Kecskemét, Hungary
3
College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa
4
Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Debrecen, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Dan-Cristian Dabija, Catalina Soriana Sitnikov, Anca Bandoi, Dana Danciulescu and Cristinel Vasiliu
Sustainability 2021, 13(20), 11174; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011174
Received: 13 September 2021 / Revised: 5 October 2021 / Accepted: 7 October 2021 / Published: 10 October 2021
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a destructive affair for both workplace and community. However, with the strengthen of global anti-pandemic measures, COVID-19 becomes the norm and there is an increased trend for people to reflect on life or death. Moreover, regardless of its facilitating role in advancing organizational behavior (OB) study, very few studies empirically examine the effects of death reflection in the work domain. Drawing on the generativity theory, we identify how death reflection influences employees’ in-role and extra-role performance under the COVID-19 pandemic. A longitudinal study is performed by using multi-source data from 387 employees in China. Our results reveal that the COVID-19-triggered death reflection is associated with the stronger in-role performance and organizational citizenship behaviors. We find that duty orientation is the mechanism that can explain the effects of the COVID-19-triggered death reflection on employees’ work behaviors. Furthermore, employees who reflect on death with high (vs. low) career and calling orientations tend to have higher in-role and extra-role performance, while employees who reflect on death with low (vs. high) job orientation are likely to have lower in-role and extra-role performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: death reflection; duty orientation; work orientation; job performance; COVID-19 death reflection; duty orientation; work orientation; job performance; COVID-19
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wei, S.; He, Y.; Zhou, W.; Popp, J.; Oláh, J. Death Reflection and Employee Work Behavior in the COVID-19 New Normal Time: The Role of Duty Orientation and Work Orientation. Sustainability 2021, 13, 11174. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011174

AMA Style

Wei S, He Y, Zhou W, Popp J, Oláh J. Death Reflection and Employee Work Behavior in the COVID-19 New Normal Time: The Role of Duty Orientation and Work Orientation. Sustainability. 2021; 13(20):11174. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011174

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wei, Shilong, Yuting He, Wenxia Zhou, József Popp, and Judit Oláh. 2021. "Death Reflection and Employee Work Behavior in the COVID-19 New Normal Time: The Role of Duty Orientation and Work Orientation" Sustainability 13, no. 20: 11174. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011174

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