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Article

Implementing Regenerative Standards in Politically Green Nordic Social Welfare States: Can Sweden Adopt the Living Building Challenge?

1
Maram Architecture, Pryssgränd 10b, 118 20 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff University, Bute Building, King Edward VII Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3NB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 738; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020738
Received: 8 December 2020 / Revised: 7 January 2021 / Accepted: 8 January 2021 / Published: 14 January 2021
This paper focuses on understanding the place for regenerative building standards within the context of politically green Nordic social welfare states. To this end, it examines the particular case of adopting the Living Building Challenge (LBC), an iconic example of regenerative design standard, in Sweden. An extensive document analysis comparing the Swedish building and planning regulations as well as the Miljöbyggnad national certification system with the LBC, shows overlaps and barriers the standard can face when adopted in the country. Barriers are validated and further discussed in interviews with one of the few architects trying to achieve a certified LBC building in Sweden and Swedish public authorities from the Boverket (Swedish National Board of Housing, Building and Planning). Results from the document analysis and interviews show barriers to implement the LBC in Sweden are a product of a conscious political and ideological decision from the welfare state which considers infrastructure, and all its potential sustainable versions, a public good to be provided to all and funded by all. This premise contrasts with the self-sufficient approach promoted by the LBC, which in this particular aspect, can be interpreted as a threat to the welfare state. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainability in the welfare state; urban regeneration in Nordic countries; sustainable and regenerative infrastructure; sustainable and regenerative policies; sustainability and regeneration sustainability in the welfare state; urban regeneration in Nordic countries; sustainable and regenerative infrastructure; sustainable and regenerative policies; sustainability and regeneration
MDPI and ACS Style

Forsberg, M.; de Souza, C.B. Implementing Regenerative Standards in Politically Green Nordic Social Welfare States: Can Sweden Adopt the Living Building Challenge? Sustainability 2021, 13, 738. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020738

AMA Style

Forsberg M, de Souza CB. Implementing Regenerative Standards in Politically Green Nordic Social Welfare States: Can Sweden Adopt the Living Building Challenge? Sustainability. 2021; 13(2):738. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020738

Chicago/Turabian Style

Forsberg, Mara, and Clarice Bleil de Souza. 2021. "Implementing Regenerative Standards in Politically Green Nordic Social Welfare States: Can Sweden Adopt the Living Building Challenge?" Sustainability 13, no. 2: 738. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020738

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