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Article

Experimental Analysis of CO2 Concentration Changes in an Apartment Using a Residential Heat Recovery Ventilator

1
Korea Institute of Civil Engineering & Building Technology, 283 Goyangdae-ro, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang-si 10223, Korea
2
Department of Architecture & Architectural Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 03772, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Weixin Yang, Guanghui Yuan and Yunpeng Yang
Sustainability 2021, 13(18), 10302; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810302
Received: 4 August 2021 / Revised: 7 September 2021 / Accepted: 13 September 2021 / Published: 15 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution Control and Sustainable Development)
Korean law requires at least three levels of control for apartment ventilation systems, including 0.5 air change per hour (ACH). When this law was enacted, it was believed that a 0.5 ACH air flow rate would be sufficient for apartments following building completion. However, ventilation systems cause different air qualities in each space within a unit, depending on infiltration rate and number of occupants. In addition, the current ventilation rate standard is based on an apartment unit’s total area, assuming that all room doors are open. In this study, changes in CO2 concentration were experimentally analyzed based on the number of occupants and various ventilation frequencies with closed doors to analyze air quality differences among rooms in a typical 85 m2 apartment unit in Korea. When the 0.5 ACH ventilation was performed, maintaining 1000 ppm or less was difficult if four people stayed for more than two hours in the living room or two people stayed for more than one hour in the bedroom with closed doors. Our results indicate that it is challenging to maintain a CO2 concentration of 1000 ppm when doors are closed as standards are calculated based on a unit’s total area. Therefore, ventilation systems should be required to provide different air volumes for each room. View Full-Text
Keywords: mechanical ventilation systems; minimum ventilation level; Korea housing; CO2 concentration; apartment ventilation mechanical ventilation systems; minimum ventilation level; Korea housing; CO2 concentration; apartment ventilation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cho, K.; Cho, D.; Kim, T. Experimental Analysis of CO2 Concentration Changes in an Apartment Using a Residential Heat Recovery Ventilator. Sustainability 2021, 13, 10302. https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810302

AMA Style

Cho K, Cho D, Kim T. Experimental Analysis of CO2 Concentration Changes in an Apartment Using a Residential Heat Recovery Ventilator. Sustainability. 2021; 13(18):10302. https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810302

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cho, Kyungjoo, Dongwoo Cho, and Taeyeon Kim. 2021. "Experimental Analysis of CO2 Concentration Changes in an Apartment Using a Residential Heat Recovery Ventilator" Sustainability 13, no. 18: 10302. https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810302

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