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Article

Community Support or Funding Amount: Actual Contribution of Reward-Based Crowdfunding to Market Success of Video Game Projects on Kickstarter

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Department of International Trade, Bogazici University, Bebek, 34342 Istanbul, Turkey
2
Department of Business Informatics—Information Engineering, Johannes Kepler University, 4040 Linz, Austria
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Francesco Cappa, Angelo Natalicchio, Riccardo Maiolini, Jakob Pohlisch and Erica Mazzola
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 9195; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13169195
Received: 27 June 2021 / Revised: 8 August 2021 / Accepted: 12 August 2021 / Published: 16 August 2021
The research provides empirical evidence differentiating between market success and funding success in reward-based crowdfunding campaigns of video games and hypothesizes that the actual contribution of crowdfunding is more stemming from community support and feedback rather than funding amount. The paper uses publicly available data by combining three different sources. Project data from Kickstarter, a large crowdfunding website, in the video game category are extracted and matched with market success variables of ratings and revenues from two other public sources namely Metacritic and Steamspy. Regression results indicate that once the project is successfully funded, the funding amount does not have a significant effect on market success variables. On the other hand, the number of backers as a community support variable is a significant determinant of market success in terms of higher revenues and ratings for a project. Whether the project was successfully funded or not moderates some of the relationships. Prior literature is predominantly focused on crowdfunding success in terms of financing. Yet, this study empirically demonstrates that funding does not necessarily indicate that projects will be successful in the market and further shows the actual contribution of crowdfunding to the market success of video game projects is the community engagement, not the funding amount. This study contributes to the rapidly emerging crowdfunding literature by extending its boundaries from the crowdfunding platforms themselves to the differentiated effects of crowdfunding on market success, which has not been studied thoroughly. This paper provides a new avenue of research by suggesting not solely focusing on funding outcomes but understanding, defining and explaining the dynamics of the community aspect in crowdfunding platforms with their repercussions on market success. Future work can also highlight potential differences in these effects between product groups, as well as more holistically assess market success and capture interactions within the community on crowdfunding platforms. View Full-Text
Keywords: reward-based crowdfunding; Kickstarter; community engagement; market success; video games reward-based crowdfunding; Kickstarter; community engagement; market success; video games
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MDPI and ACS Style

Aygoren, O.; Koch, S. Community Support or Funding Amount: Actual Contribution of Reward-Based Crowdfunding to Market Success of Video Game Projects on Kickstarter. Sustainability 2021, 13, 9195. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13169195

AMA Style

Aygoren O, Koch S. Community Support or Funding Amount: Actual Contribution of Reward-Based Crowdfunding to Market Success of Video Game Projects on Kickstarter. Sustainability. 2021; 13(16):9195. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13169195

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aygoren, Oguzhan, and Stefan Koch. 2021. "Community Support or Funding Amount: Actual Contribution of Reward-Based Crowdfunding to Market Success of Video Game Projects on Kickstarter" Sustainability 13, no. 16: 9195. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13169195

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