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Article

Rodent Virus Diversity and Differentiation across Post-Katrina New Orleans

1
Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
2
Center for Vaccines and Immunity, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH 43205, USA
3
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
4
Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
5
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Public Health, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Wen Cheng Liu
Sustainability 2021, 13(14), 8034; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13148034
Received: 15 June 2021 / Revised: 10 July 2021 / Accepted: 11 July 2021 / Published: 19 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Socioecology of Disasters and Infectious Disease)
Concern about elevated disease risk following disasters has been growing with the progression of global trends in urbanization and climate, in part because shifts in socioecological conditions can promote greater human contact with pathogen reservoirs in cities. Remarkably little is known, however, about the diversity and distributions of pathogens carried by commensal reservoirs across disaster-affected urban landscapes. To address this deficit, we characterized the assemblage structure of viruses in the serum of three widespread commensal rodents (Rattus norvegicus, Rattus rattus, and Mus musculus) that were trapped in New Orleans (LA, USA) following Hurricane Katrina. We assessed virus diversity and differentiation according to host species identity, co-occurrence and abundance, as well as prevailing landscape features known to shape urban rodent assemblages. We detected ≥34 viruses in total, including several pathogens of concern, through metagenomic analysis of serum taken from ≥149 individuals of each host species. We found that virus richness as well as assemblage composition and spatial differentiation differed by host species. Notably, we detected associations with host species co-occurrence and abundance, and while we found that assemblage structure varied by study area, we did not detect strong associations with landscape features known to influence rodent hosts. Evidence that virus diversity and assemblage structure reflect host identity more so than other factors indicates that biotic benchmarks might serve as prognostic indicators of post-disaster pathogen exposure risk in cities worldwide. View Full-Text
Keywords: abandonment; disaster; emerging infectious disease; pathogens; surveillance; urban; virome abandonment; disaster; emerging infectious disease; pathogens; surveillance; urban; virome
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MDPI and ACS Style

Peterson, A.C.; Sharma, H.; Kumar, A.; Ghersi, B.M.; Emrich, S.J.; Vandegrift, K.J.; Kapoor, A.; Blum, M.J. Rodent Virus Diversity and Differentiation across Post-Katrina New Orleans. Sustainability 2021, 13, 8034. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13148034

AMA Style

Peterson AC, Sharma H, Kumar A, Ghersi BM, Emrich SJ, Vandegrift KJ, Kapoor A, Blum MJ. Rodent Virus Diversity and Differentiation across Post-Katrina New Orleans. Sustainability. 2021; 13(14):8034. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13148034

Chicago/Turabian Style

Peterson, Anna C., Himanshu Sharma, Arvind Kumar, Bruno M. Ghersi, Scott J. Emrich, Kurt J. Vandegrift, Amit Kapoor, and Michael J. Blum. 2021. "Rodent Virus Diversity and Differentiation across Post-Katrina New Orleans" Sustainability 13, no. 14: 8034. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13148034

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