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Review

Characteristics of Organically Grown Compared to Conventionally Grown Potato and the Processed Products: A Review

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Agricultural Science Center at Farmington, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 1018, Farmington, NM 87499, USA
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Department of Entomology, Plant Pathology, and Weed Science, New Mexico State University, MSC 3BE, P.O. Box 30003, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA
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Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department, Kansas State University, 1016 Seaton Hall, 920 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
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Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University, P.O. Box 646420, Pullman, WA 99164, USA
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San Luis Valley Research Center, Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Colorado State University, 0249 E Rd. 9 N, Center, CO 81125, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sara Bosi
Sustainability 2021, 13(11), 6289; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13116289
Received: 22 April 2021 / Revised: 26 May 2021 / Accepted: 26 May 2021 / Published: 2 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Organic Agriculture)
Interest in organic foods is increasing at a moment when humanity is facing a range of health challenges including the concern that some conventionally produced foods may pose possible adverse effects on human and livestock health. With the increasing human population, intensive production is increasingly trending towards high-input systems that aim to close yield gaps, increase crop yields, and develop new crop varieties with higher yield potential and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, all within the context of incorporating specific traits to satisfy consumer demand. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is one of the most consumed foods under different cultural diets; however, its production faces some challenges related to soilborne diseases, marketable yield and quality, sugars and dry matter content of the produced tubers, tuber content in terms of nitrate, minerals, vitamins, bioactive compounds, and antioxidants, and consumer appreciation regarding the sensory characteristics of tubers and processed products. Different studies have been investigating some of these challenges, with sometimes straightforward and sometimes conflicting results. This variability in research results indicates the general non-transferability of the results from one location to another under the same management practices in addition to differences in plant material. This review compares some characteristics of raw or boiled potato and processed products from potato tubers grown organically and conventionally. Ideally, such information may be of benefit in decision making by consumers in their dietary choices, by potato growers in their selection of crop management practices, and by scientists looking at potential areas for future research on potatoes. View Full-Text
Keywords: organic; conventional; potato; quality; disease organic; conventional; potato; quality; disease
MDPI and ACS Style

Djaman, K.; Sanogo, S.; Koudahe, K.; Allen, S.; Saibou, A.; Essah, S. Characteristics of Organically Grown Compared to Conventionally Grown Potato and the Processed Products: A Review. Sustainability 2021, 13, 6289. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13116289

AMA Style

Djaman K, Sanogo S, Koudahe K, Allen S, Saibou A, Essah S. Characteristics of Organically Grown Compared to Conventionally Grown Potato and the Processed Products: A Review. Sustainability. 2021; 13(11):6289. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13116289

Chicago/Turabian Style

Djaman, Koffi, Soum Sanogo, Komlan Koudahe, Samuel Allen, Aminou Saibou, and Samuel Essah. 2021. "Characteristics of Organically Grown Compared to Conventionally Grown Potato and the Processed Products: A Review" Sustainability 13, no. 11: 6289. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13116289

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