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Article

Determinants of Household Income and Willingness to Pay for Indigenous Plants in North West Province, South Africa: A Two-Stage Heckman Approach

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Food Security and Safety Niche Area, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X2046, Mmabatho 2790, South Africa
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Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS) Centre, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X2046, Mmabatho 2790, South Africa
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Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X2046, Mmabatho 2790, South Africa
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Economics Research Branch, Agrifood and Biosciences Institute (AFBI), 18a Newforge Lane, Belfast BT9 5PX, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Aaron K. Hoshide
Sustainability 2021, 13(10), 5458; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105458
Received: 10 March 2021 / Revised: 3 May 2021 / Accepted: 6 May 2021 / Published: 13 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Agricultural Development Economics and Policy)
Using a cross-sectional dataset, this study examines the factors influencing the income and willingness to pay for indigenous plants by rural households in the North West Province of South Africa. The method of data analysis was based on a two-stage Heckman model. Based on empirical data, the majority (93%) of the households are willing to pay for the indigenous plants. Furthermore, factors such as the age of the household’s head, marital status, size of households, financial returns and economic benefit of indigenous plants significantly influenced income and willingness to pay for indigenous plants by the households. Thus, indigenous plants have the potential to penetrate local and international markets and can be used to improve the economies, livelihood, and food security status of rural households in South Africa. Indigenous plant cultivation can increase agro-food system species diversity while conserving plant species indigenous to this area of South Africa. Encouraging both consumption and production of indigenous plants can also help diversify local economies and communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: consumers’ food preference; contingent valuation; purchasing power; market prospects; rural economy; sustainability consumers’ food preference; contingent valuation; purchasing power; market prospects; rural economy; sustainability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Omotayo, A.O.; Ndhlovu, P.T.; Tshwene, S.C.; Olagunju, K.O.; Aremu, A.O. Determinants of Household Income and Willingness to Pay for Indigenous Plants in North West Province, South Africa: A Two-Stage Heckman Approach. Sustainability 2021, 13, 5458. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105458

AMA Style

Omotayo AO, Ndhlovu PT, Tshwene SC, Olagunju KO, Aremu AO. Determinants of Household Income and Willingness to Pay for Indigenous Plants in North West Province, South Africa: A Two-Stage Heckman Approach. Sustainability. 2021; 13(10):5458. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105458

Chicago/Turabian Style

Omotayo, Abiodun O., Peter T. Ndhlovu, Seleke C. Tshwene, Kehinde O. Olagunju, and Adeyemi O. Aremu 2021. "Determinants of Household Income and Willingness to Pay for Indigenous Plants in North West Province, South Africa: A Two-Stage Heckman Approach" Sustainability 13, no. 10: 5458. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105458

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