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Food Loss and Waste Prevention Strategies from Farm to Fork

Department of Environmental, Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta, Italy
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Academic Editors: Felicitas Schneider, Stefan Lange and Thomas Schmidt
Sustainability 2021, 13(10), 5443; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105443
Received: 26 April 2021 / Revised: 7 May 2021 / Accepted: 11 May 2021 / Published: 13 May 2021
About one-third of the food produced globally for human consumption is lost or wasted each year. This represents a loss of natural resources consumed along the food supply chain that can also have negative impacts on food security. While food loss occurs between production and distribution and is prevalent in low-income countries, food waste occurs mainly at the consumer level, in the retail and food service sectors, and especially in developed countries. Preventing food losses and waste is therefore a potential strategy for better balance food supply and demand and is essential to improve food security while reducing environmental impact and providing economic benefits to the different actors in the food supply chain. In this context, we specifically provide an overview of case studies and examples of legislation from different countries and actions carried out by the various actors in the food chain and by non-profit organisations to effectively prevent and or reduce food loss and waste. We also outline current limitations and possible research avenues. We conclude that the comparison and the integration of knowledge, and the awareness of where along the food chain, for which foods and in which countries the greatest losses are produced, is essential to decide where and how to target efforts in the most effective way. View Full-Text
Keywords: food waste; food loss; policy; legislation; SDG 12.3; national strategies; food supply chain; food redistribution; multi-stakeholder cooperation food waste; food loss; policy; legislation; SDG 12.3; national strategies; food supply chain; food redistribution; multi-stakeholder cooperation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nicastro, R.; Carillo, P. Food Loss and Waste Prevention Strategies from Farm to Fork. Sustainability 2021, 13, 5443. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105443

AMA Style

Nicastro R, Carillo P. Food Loss and Waste Prevention Strategies from Farm to Fork. Sustainability. 2021; 13(10):5443. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105443

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nicastro, Rosalinda, and Petronia Carillo. 2021. "Food Loss and Waste Prevention Strategies from Farm to Fork" Sustainability 13, no. 10: 5443. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105443

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