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Article

Participatory Food Cities: Scholar Activism and the Co-Production of Food Knowledge

Geography, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4RJ, UK
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3548; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093548
Received: 31 December 2019 / Revised: 23 March 2020 / Accepted: 2 April 2020 / Published: 27 April 2020
UK food policy assemblages link a broad range of actors in place-based contexts, working to address increasingly distanciated food supply chains, issues of food justice and more. Academic interest in social movements, such as Sustainable Food Cities, has in recent years taken a participatory turn, with academics seeking to foreground the voices of community-based actors and to work alongside them as part of the movement. Bringing together literatures on multiscalar food governance and participatory methods, this paper investigates the intersection of food policy networks via a place-based case study focused on the co-convening of a community acting to co-produce knowledge of household food insecurity in a UK city. By taking a scholar activist approach, this paper sets out how a place-based cross-sectoral food community mobilised collective knowledge and brought together a community of practice to tackle urgent issues of food justice. Drawing from Borras 2016, it will explore how scholar activism requires the blurring of boundaries between thinking and doing in order to both act with, and reflect on, the food movement. The issues of actively driving forward a food network, along with the tensions and challenges that arise, are investigated, whilst also foregrounding the role academics have in linking food policy and praxis via place-based food communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainable food cities; scholar activism; multiscale food networks; knowledge co-production; participatory and engaged research sustainable food cities; scholar activism; multiscale food networks; knowledge co-production; participatory and engaged research
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sandover, R. Participatory Food Cities: Scholar Activism and the Co-Production of Food Knowledge. Sustainability 2020, 12, 3548. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093548

AMA Style

Sandover R. Participatory Food Cities: Scholar Activism and the Co-Production of Food Knowledge. Sustainability. 2020; 12(9):3548. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093548

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sandover, Rebecca. 2020. "Participatory Food Cities: Scholar Activism and the Co-Production of Food Knowledge" Sustainability 12, no. 9: 3548. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093548

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