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Article

Carbon and Water Footprints of Tibet: Spatial Pattern and Trend Analysis

by 1,2, 1,2, 1,2,*, 1,2 and 3,*
1
School of Management, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, China
2
Research Center of Industrial Transfer and Innovation Development, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, China
3
Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3294; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083294
Received: 7 March 2020 / Revised: 14 April 2020 / Accepted: 15 April 2020 / Published: 17 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Industrial and Natural Impacts toward the Future)
Tibet in China has extremely a fragile natural ecosystem, which is under a great pressure from global changes. The carbon footprint (CF) and water footprint (WF), reflecting the pressures of regional development on the natural environment, represent a lacuna in the field of study in Tibet due to missing data. In this paper, the 2012 multi-regional input–output table of China was employed to quantify the CF and WF of Tibet and the relationship between Tibet and other provinces of China. Spatial pattern and key sectors were also studied to demonstrate the current characters and the future trend of footprints. Tibet’s carbon emission was 4.0 Mt, 32.7% of CF, indicating that Tibet was a net importing region of carbon emission. Tibet received embodied carbon emission by trade from other regions, especially from Hebei, Inner Mongolia and Henan provinces, but played a complex role in virtual water allocation by transferring to most provinces and receiving from some provinces. The CF of Tibet will increase under different scenarios of 2030, but the WF can be restricted to 2.5 Gt in the slow scenario. In the future, imports of virtual resources will benefit the fragile ecosystem of Tibet and moreover, it is vital to restrict the local resource-intensive sectors and improve resource-use efficiency. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbon footprint; water footprint; multi-regional input–output model; Tibet; environmental impact carbon footprint; water footprint; multi-regional input–output model; Tibet; environmental impact
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MDPI and ACS Style

Xie, W.; Hu, S.; Li, F.; Cao, X.; Tang, Z. Carbon and Water Footprints of Tibet: Spatial Pattern and Trend Analysis. Sustainability 2020, 12, 3294. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083294

AMA Style

Xie W, Hu S, Li F, Cao X, Tang Z. Carbon and Water Footprints of Tibet: Spatial Pattern and Trend Analysis. Sustainability. 2020; 12(8):3294. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083294

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xie, Wu, Shuai Hu, Fangyi Li, Xin Cao, and Zhipeng Tang. 2020. "Carbon and Water Footprints of Tibet: Spatial Pattern and Trend Analysis" Sustainability 12, no. 8: 3294. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083294

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