Next Article in Journal
Willingness to Pay for Forest Existence Value and Sustainability
Next Article in Special Issue
Reduction Strategies for Greenhouse Gas Emissions from High-Speed Railway Station Buildings in a Cold Climate Zone of China
Previous Article in Journal
Analysis of Dissolved Oxygen and Nutrients in Zhanjiang Bay and the Adjacent Sea Area in Spring
Previous Article in Special Issue
Window Design of Naturally Ventilated Offices in the Mediterranean Climate in Terms of CO2 and Thermal Comfort Performance
Open AccessArticle

Qualifying the Sustainability of Novel Designs and Existing Solutions for Post-Disaster and Post-Conflict Sheltering

1
Faculty of Engineering, Mutah University, Karak 61710, Jordan
2
REBEL (Resource Efficient Built Environment Lab), School of Engineering and the Built Environment, Edinburgh Napier University, 10 Colinton Road, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK
3
Independent Built Environment Consultant, Nairobi 00200, Kenya
4
Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 890; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030890
Received: 27 November 2019 / Revised: 17 January 2020 / Accepted: 19 January 2020 / Published: 24 January 2020
During the course of 2018, 70.8 million people globally were forcibly displaced due to natural disasters and conflicts—a staggering increase of 2.9 million people compared to the previous year’s figure. Displaced people cluster in refugee camps which have very often the scale of a medium-sized city. Post-disaster and post-conflict (PDPC) sheltering therefore represents a vitally important element for both the short- and long-term wellbeing of the displaced. However, the constrained environment which dominates PDPC sheltering often results in a lack of consideration of sustainability dimensions. Neglecting sustainability has severe practical consequences on both people and the environment, and in the long run it also incurs higher costs. It is therefore imperative to quickly transfer to PDPC sheltering where sustainability considerations are a key element of the design and decision-making processes. To facilitate such transition, this article reviews both ‘existing solutions’ and ‘novel designs’ for PDPC sheltering against the three pillars of sustainability. Both clusters are systematically categorized, and pros and cons of solutions and designs are identified. This provides an overview of the attempts made so far in different contexts, and it highlights what worked and what did not. This article represents a stepping-stone for future work in this area, to both facilitate and accelerate the transition to sustainable sheltering. View Full-Text
Keywords: city; post-disaster shelter; post-conflict shelter; transitional shelter; sustainable sheltering; emergency sheltering; refugees city; post-disaster shelter; post-conflict shelter; transitional shelter; sustainable sheltering; emergency sheltering; refugees
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Alshawawreh, L.; Pomponi, F.; D’Amico, B.; Snaddon, S.; Guthrie, P. Qualifying the Sustainability of Novel Designs and Existing Solutions for Post-Disaster and Post-Conflict Sheltering. Sustainability 2020, 12, 890.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop