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Article

Frame Disputes or Frame Consensus? “Environment” or “Welfare” First Amongst Climate Strike Protesters

1
School of Social Work, Lund University, Box 23, 221 00 Lund, Sweden
2
School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University, 141 89 Huddinge, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 882; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030882
Received: 14 December 2019 / Revised: 20 January 2020 / Accepted: 21 January 2020 / Published: 24 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Welfare beyond Growth)
Present debates suppose a close linkage between economic, social, and environmental sustainability and suggest that individual wellbeing and living standards need to be understood as directly linked to environmental concerns. Because social movements are often seen as an avant-garde in pushing for change, this article analyzes climate protesters’ support for three key frames in current periods of social transformation, i.e., an “environmental”, an “economic growth”, and a “welfare” frame. The analyzed data material consists of survey responses from over 900 participants in six Global Climate Strikes held in Sweden during 2019. The article investigates the explanatory relevance of three factors: (a) political and ideological orientation, (b) movement involvement, and (c) social characteristics. The results indicate that climate protesters to a large degree support an environmental frame before an economic growth-oriented frame, whereas the situation is more complex regarding support for a welfare frame vis-á-vis an environmental frame. The strongest factors explaining frame support include social characteristics (gender) and protestors’ political and ideological orientation. Movement involvement has limited significance. The article shows how these frames form a fragment of the complexity of these issues, and instances of frame distinctions, hierarchies, and disputes emerge within the most current forms of climate change demonstrations. View Full-Text
Keywords: global climate strike; demonstrations; environmental movement; frame support; frames; protest surveys; sustainability; sustainable welfare; Greta Thunberg; Fridays For Future global climate strike; demonstrations; environmental movement; frame support; frames; protest surveys; sustainability; sustainable welfare; Greta Thunberg; Fridays For Future
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MDPI and ACS Style

Emilsson, K.; Johansson, H.; Wennerhag, M. Frame Disputes or Frame Consensus? “Environment” or “Welfare” First Amongst Climate Strike Protesters. Sustainability 2020, 12, 882. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030882

AMA Style

Emilsson K, Johansson H, Wennerhag M. Frame Disputes or Frame Consensus? “Environment” or “Welfare” First Amongst Climate Strike Protesters. Sustainability. 2020; 12(3):882. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030882

Chicago/Turabian Style

Emilsson, Kajsa, Håkan Johansson, and Magnus Wennerhag. 2020. "Frame Disputes or Frame Consensus? “Environment” or “Welfare” First Amongst Climate Strike Protesters" Sustainability 12, no. 3: 882. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030882

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