Next Article in Journal
Decision Support System for the Sustainable Seismic and Energy Renovation of Buildings: Methodological Layout
Next Article in Special Issue
Local Action with Global Impact: The Case of the GROW Observatory and the Sustainable Development Goals
Previous Article in Journal
Multicriteria Intermodal Freight Network Optimal Problem with Heterogeneous Preferences under Belt and Road Initiative
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Role of Citizen Science in Meeting SDG Targets around Soil Health
Article

Citizen Science Monitoring for Sustainable Development Goal Indicator 6.3.2 in England and Zambia

1
Earthwatch Europe, Oxford OX2 7DE, UK
2
United Nations Environment Programme GEMS/Water Capacity Development Centre, School of Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences and Environmental Research Institute University College Cork, T23 XE10 Cork, Ireland
3
Water Resources Management Authority (WARMA), Lusaka 10101, Zambia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(24), 10271; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410271
Received: 31 October 2020 / Revised: 2 December 2020 / Accepted: 4 December 2020 / Published: 9 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Citizen Science and the Role in Sustainable Development)
Citizen science has the potential to support the delivery of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through its integration into national monitoring schemes. In this study, we explored the opportunities and biases of citizen science (CS) data when used either as a primary or secondary source for SDG 6.3.2 reporting. We used data from waterbodies with both CS and regulatory monitoring in England and Zambia to explore their biases and complementarity. A comparative analysis of regulatory and CS data provided key information on appropriate sampling frequency, site selection, and measurement parameters necessary for robust SDG reporting. The results showed elevated agreement for pass/fail ratios and indicator scores for English waterbodies (80%) and demonstrated that CS data improved for granularity and spatial coverage for SDG indicator scoring, even when extensive statutory monitoring programs were present. In Zambia, management authorities are actively using citizen science projects to increase spatial and temporal coverage for SDG reporting. Our results indicate that design considerations for SDG focused citizen science can address local needs and provide a more representative indicator of the state of a nation’s freshwater ecosystems for international reporting requirements. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainable development goals; citizen science; indicator 6.3.2 ambient water quality; freshwater watch sustainable development goals; citizen science; indicator 6.3.2 ambient water quality; freshwater watch
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bishop, I.J.; Warner, S.; van Noordwijk, T.C.G.E.; Nyoni, F.C.; Loiselle, S. Citizen Science Monitoring for Sustainable Development Goal Indicator 6.3.2 in England and Zambia. Sustainability 2020, 12, 10271. https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410271

AMA Style

Bishop IJ, Warner S, van Noordwijk TCGE, Nyoni FC, Loiselle S. Citizen Science Monitoring for Sustainable Development Goal Indicator 6.3.2 in England and Zambia. Sustainability. 2020; 12(24):10271. https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410271

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bishop, Isabel J., Stuart Warner, Toos C.G.E. van Noordwijk, Frank C. Nyoni, and Steven Loiselle. 2020. "Citizen Science Monitoring for Sustainable Development Goal Indicator 6.3.2 in England and Zambia" Sustainability 12, no. 24: 10271. https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410271

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop