Next Article in Journal
Too Costly to Disregard: The Cost Competitiveness of Environmental Operating Practices
Previous Article in Journal
Sustainability Outcomes of Green Processes in Relation to Industry 4.0 in Manufacturing: Systematic Review
Article

Evaluating Sustainable Intensification of Groundnut Production in Northern Ghana Using the Sustainable Intensification Assessment Framework Approach

1
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, P.O. Box TL 06, Tamale 03720, Ghana
2
Universal Developers Consultancy, P.O. Box ER 670, Tamale 03720, Ghana
3
International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Nairobi 823-00621, Kenya
4
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, P.M.B 5320, Ibadan 200001, Nigeria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(15), 5970; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12155970
Received: 17 June 2020 / Revised: 3 July 2020 / Accepted: 5 July 2020 / Published: 24 July 2020
The sustainable intensification of crop production system requires the efficient use of resources. A 3-year on-farm experiment was conducted to determine the sustainability of plant density for groundnut production in Northern Ghana using the sustainable intensification assessment framework (SIAF). The SIAF allows the assessment of the sustainable intensification potential of the agricultural system in five domains: productivity, economics, environment, human, and social. The experiment was laid out in a strip plot design with six groundnut varieties (early maturity type: Chinese, Yenyewoso, and Samnut 23, and late maturity type: Azivivi, Mani pinta, and Samnut 22) as the horizontal plot factor and four plant densities (22, 15, 11, and 9 plant/m2) as the vertical plot factor. Using the SIAF as a guide, data on grain and fodder yield (productivity), net income and benefit cost ratio (economic), vegetative cover at 30, 40, and 50 days after planting and harvesting and biological nitrogen fixation (environment), calorie and protein production (human), and technology rating by gender (social) were recorded to calculate the sustainability indices of the treatments. The results showed that the sustainability indices for the Yenyewoso and Mani pinta groundnut varieties were above 1 in all the regions, indicating that both groundnut maturity types are sustainable for cultivation in the Northern regions of Ghana. Planting both groundnut maturity types at a density of 22 plant/m2 increased the sustainability index threefold compared with the farmer practice (9 plant/m2) and 79% compared with the 11 and 15 plant/m2. This suggests that planting groundnut at a density of 22 plant/m2 will sustainably intensify groundnut production in Northern Ghana and similar agro-ecologies across West Africa. View Full-Text
Keywords: Arachis hypogeae; plant density; SIAF; savanna Arachis hypogeae; plant density; SIAF; savanna
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Abdul Rahman, N.; Larbi, A.; Kotu, B.; Kizito, F.; Hoeschle-Zeledon, I. Evaluating Sustainable Intensification of Groundnut Production in Northern Ghana Using the Sustainable Intensification Assessment Framework Approach. Sustainability 2020, 12, 5970. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12155970

AMA Style

Abdul Rahman N, Larbi A, Kotu B, Kizito F, Hoeschle-Zeledon I. Evaluating Sustainable Intensification of Groundnut Production in Northern Ghana Using the Sustainable Intensification Assessment Framework Approach. Sustainability. 2020; 12(15):5970. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12155970

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abdul Rahman, Nurudeen, Asamoah Larbi, Bekele Kotu, Fred Kizito, and Irmgard Hoeschle-Zeledon. 2020. "Evaluating Sustainable Intensification of Groundnut Production in Northern Ghana Using the Sustainable Intensification Assessment Framework Approach" Sustainability 12, no. 15: 5970. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12155970

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop