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Article

Mobility Acceptance Factors of an Automated Shuttle Bus Last-Mile Service

1
FinEst Twins Smart City Center of Excellence, Tallinn University of Technology, 19086 Tallinn, Estonia
2
Ragnar Nurkse Department of Innovation and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology, 12618 Tallinn, Estonia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5469; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135469
Received: 21 May 2020 / Revised: 2 July 2020 / Accepted: 3 July 2020 / Published: 7 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Transportation)
The main interest of this paper is to analyze the mobility acceptance factors of an automated shuttle bus last-mile service. There is limited research on the passengers’ perception of security and safety of automated mobility, whereas prior research is mostly based on surveys interested in attitudes towards self-driving vehicles, without being linked to the experience. We, on the other hand, are interested in passengers’ feeling of security and safety, after taking a ride with an automated shuttle in an open urban environment. For studying this, we conducted an automated shuttle bus last-mile pilot during a four-month period in the city of Tallinn in late 2019. The method is a case study focusing on one city with several tools for data collection applied (surveys, interviews, document analysis). The pilot, open and free for everybody, attracted approximately 4000 passengers, out of which 4% responded to the online feedback survey. For studying the operational capacity, we had a panel interview with operators of the shuttle service, in addition to analyzing daily operational log files. The results indicate that passengers’ perceived feeling of security and safety onboard was remarkably high, after taking a ride (and lower without a ride, in a different control group). The bus was operated only if operational capacity was secured, thus having significant downtime in service due to environment, technology and traffic-related factors. View Full-Text
Keywords: automated mobility; sustainable transportation; urban mobility; last-mile; passenger’s safety; passenger’s security; operational capacity automated mobility; sustainable transportation; urban mobility; last-mile; passenger’s safety; passenger’s security; operational capacity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Soe, R.-M.; Müür, J. Mobility Acceptance Factors of an Automated Shuttle Bus Last-Mile Service. Sustainability 2020, 12, 5469. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135469

AMA Style

Soe R-M, Müür J. Mobility Acceptance Factors of an Automated Shuttle Bus Last-Mile Service. Sustainability. 2020; 12(13):5469. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135469

Chicago/Turabian Style

Soe, Ralf-Martin, and Jaanus Müür. 2020. "Mobility Acceptance Factors of an Automated Shuttle Bus Last-Mile Service" Sustainability 12, no. 13: 5469. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135469

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