Next Article in Journal
Spatial Patterns of Vineyard Abandonment and Related Land Use Transitions in Beaujolais (France): A Multiscale Approach
Previous Article in Journal
Regions and Economic Resilience: New Perspectives
Open AccessArticle

Online Grocery Shopping by NYC Public Housing Residents Using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits: A Service Ecosystems Perspective

1
Department of Health Policy and Management, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, New York, NY 10027, USA
2
CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute, New York, NY 10027, USA
3
Enterprise Community Partners, Inc., New York, NY 10004, USA
4
Karen Karp & Partners, P.O. Box 515, Southold, NY 11971, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4694; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114694
Received: 6 May 2020 / Revised: 2 June 2020 / Accepted: 5 June 2020 / Published: 9 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geographies of Responsibility for Just and Sustainable Food Systems)
This paper examines adoption of online grocery shopping, and potential cost and time savings compared to brick and mortar food retailers, by New York City public housing residents using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. A mixed methods action research project involving the co-creation of an online shopping club, the Farragut Food Club (FFC), recruited 300 members who registered to shop online using SNAP, and received waivers on delivery minimums and provided technical assistance and centralized food delivery. We conducted a survey (n = 206) and focus groups to understand shopping practices; FFC members collected receipts of groceries over two weeks before and after the pilot to measure foods purchased, stores patronized, and prices. We interviewed FFC members to elicit experiences with the pilot, and estimated cost differences between products purchased in brick and mortar stores and equivalent products online, and transportation time and cost differences. Online shopping represented a small (2.4%) percentage of grocery spending. Unit prices for products purchased on Amazon ($0.28) were significantly higher than for equivalent products purchased in brick and mortar stores ($0.23) (p < 0.001.) Compatibility with existing routines, low relative advantage, and cost of online products limited the adoption of online shopping among SNAP users. View Full-Text
Keywords: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); food stamps; food access; online grocery shopping; innovation diffusion Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); food stamps; food access; online grocery shopping; innovation diffusion
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Cohen, N.; Tomaino Fraser, K.; Arnow, C.; Mulcahy, M.; Hille, C. Online Grocery Shopping by NYC Public Housing Residents Using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits: A Service Ecosystems Perspective. Sustainability 2020, 12, 4694.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop