Next Article in Journal
Development and Predictive Validity of the Computational Thinking Disposition Questionnaire
Previous Article in Journal
Around the Anthropocene in Eighty Names—Considering the Urbanocene Proposition
Article

Organizing Joint Practices in Urban Food Initiatives—A Comparative Analysis of Gardening, Cooking and Eating Together

Chair of Sustainability Governance, Institute of Environmental Social Sciences and Geography, University of Freiburg, Tennenbacher Straße 4, D-79106 Freiburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4457; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114457
Received: 20 April 2020 / Revised: 28 May 2020 / Accepted: 28 May 2020 / Published: 31 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Urban and Rural Development)
The topic of food is highly relevant to the UN sustainable development agenda. The agenda particularly challenges cities to take on more responsibilities and to initiate processes that change unsustainable food practices. The recent emergence of urban food initiatives, such as community-supported agriculture, urban gardening, food sharing or community kitchens, promises great potential in leveraging sustainability. Although a great deal of research is already available on the societal impacts of food initiatives, little is known about organizational aspects surrounding them. The following study aims to address this gap by systematically analyzing how joint practices of gardening as well as cooking and eating are organized in different urban food initiatives, taking five initiatives in two smaller cities in southern Germany as case studies. Data were acquired through qualitative research methods including interviewing, participatory observations and document analysis. The analysis covers five key dimensions: institutional integration, recruiting mechanisms, goal-setting, time management and types of knowledge. Based on these dimensions, the results portray two distinctive organizational profiles of urban food initiatives. The article concludes with a reflection on how local governments can support food initiatives and thus contribute to sustainable urban food systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainable urban development; food system; urban food initiatives; organization; joint practices; urban gardening; community kitchen; cooking class sustainable urban development; food system; urban food initiatives; organization; joint practices; urban gardening; community kitchen; cooking class
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hennchen, B.; Pregernig, M. Organizing Joint Practices in Urban Food Initiatives—A Comparative Analysis of Gardening, Cooking and Eating Together. Sustainability 2020, 12, 4457. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114457

AMA Style

Hennchen B, Pregernig M. Organizing Joint Practices in Urban Food Initiatives—A Comparative Analysis of Gardening, Cooking and Eating Together. Sustainability. 2020; 12(11):4457. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114457

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hennchen, Benjamin, and Michael Pregernig. 2020. "Organizing Joint Practices in Urban Food Initiatives—A Comparative Analysis of Gardening, Cooking and Eating Together" Sustainability 12, no. 11: 4457. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114457

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop