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Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Practices of the Largest Seafood Suppliers in the Wild Capture Fisheries Sector: From Vision to Action

1
Marine Affairs Program, Faculty of Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
2
Anova Food USA, 280 10th Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101, USA
3
Institute for Oceans and Fisheries, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
4
Nippon Foundation Nereus Program, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
5
School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-5685, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2254; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082254
Received: 7 March 2019 / Revised: 5 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 15 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CSR and Business Ethics for Sustainable Development)
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Abstract

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the seafood industry is on the rise. Because of increasing public awareness and non-governmental organization (NGO) campaigns, seafood buyers have made various commitments to improve the sustainability of their wild seafood sourcing. As part of this effort, seafood suppliers have developed their own CSR programs in order to meet buyers’ sourcing requirements. However, the CSR of these companies, many of which are mid-supply chain or vertically integrated, remain largely invisible and unstudied. In order to better understand how mid-chain seafood suppliers engage in sustainability efforts, we reviewed the CSR practices of the 25 largest seafood companies globally (by revenue) that deal with wild seafood products. Based on literature, existing frameworks, and initial data analysis, we developed a structured framework to identify and categorize practices based on the issues addressed and the approach used. We found companies implement CSR to address four key areas, and through various activities that fit into five categories: Power; Practices; Partnerships; Public policy; and Philanthropy. One of the biggest gaps identified in this study is the lack of accountability mechanisms, as well as robust and consistent accounting of impacts. Indeed, many companies express commitments without clear goals and structures in place to ensure implementation. Therefore, improvements in seafood company performance on social and environmental aspects may not only require creating a better business case for CSR, but also require ensuring that companies have the necessary processes and structures in place through public oversights and regulations. View Full-Text
Keywords: corporate social responsibility; private governance; greening supply chains; sustainable supply chain management; eco-certification; sustainable seafood corporate social responsibility; private governance; greening supply chains; sustainable supply chain management; eco-certification; sustainable seafood
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Packer, H.; Swartz, W.; Ota, Y.; Bailey, M. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Practices of the Largest Seafood Suppliers in the Wild Capture Fisheries Sector: From Vision to Action. Sustainability 2019, 11, 2254.

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