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Editorial

Marketing and Sustainability: Business as Usual or Changing Worldviews?

1
Department of Marketing, University of Auckland Business School, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
2
Department of Management, Marketing and Entrepreneurship, UC Business School, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand
3
Department of Geography, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland
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School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University, 351 95 Kalmar, Sweden
5
UC Business School, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 780; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030780
Received: 29 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Marketing and Sustainability)
Marketing, and the business schools within which most marketing academics and researchers work, have a fraught relationship with sustainability. Marketing is typically regarded as encouraging overconsumption and contributing to global change yet, simultaneously, it is also promoted as a means to enable sustainable consumption. Based on a critical review of the literature, the paper responds to the need to better understand the underpinnings of marketing worldviews with respect to sustainability. The paper discusses the concept of worldviews and their transformation, sustainability’s articulation in marketing and business schools, and the implications of the market logic dominance in faculty mind-sets. This is timely given that business schools are increasingly positioning themselves as a positive contributor to sustainability. Institutional barriers, specifically within universities, business schools, and the marketing discipline, are identified as affecting the ability to effect ‘bottom-up’ change. It is concluded that if institutions, including disciplines and business schools, remain wedded to assumptions regarding the compatibility between the environment and economic growth and acceptance of market forces then the development of alternative perspectives on sustainability remains highly problematic. View Full-Text
Keywords: green marketing; sustainable marketing; sustainable development; sustainability; institutional change; paradigm change; worldview green marketing; sustainable marketing; sustainable development; sustainability; institutional change; paradigm change; worldview
MDPI and ACS Style

Kemper, J.A.; Hall, C.M.; Ballantine, P.W. Marketing and Sustainability: Business as Usual or Changing Worldviews? Sustainability 2019, 11, 780. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030780

AMA Style

Kemper JA, Hall CM, Ballantine PW. Marketing and Sustainability: Business as Usual or Changing Worldviews? Sustainability. 2019; 11(3):780. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030780

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kemper, Joya A., C. M. Hall, and Paul W. Ballantine. 2019. "Marketing and Sustainability: Business as Usual or Changing Worldviews?" Sustainability 11, no. 3: 780. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030780

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