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Open AccessArticle

The Politics of Selection: Towards a Transformative Model of Environmental Innovation

1
Institute for Social Change and Sustainability, Vienna University of Economics and Business, 1020 Vienna, Austria
2
Institute of Social Ecology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), 1070 Vienna, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 506; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020506
Received: 8 November 2018 / Revised: 14 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
As a purposive sustainability transition requires environmental innovation and innovation policy, we discuss potentials and limitations of three dominant strands of literature in this field, namely the multi-level perspective on socio-technical transitions (MLP), the innovation systems approach (IS), and the long-wave theory of techno-economic paradigm shifts (LWT). All three are epistemologically rooted in an evolutionary understanding of socio-technical change. While these approaches are appropriate to understand market-driven processes of change, they may be deficient as analytical tools for exploring and designing processes of purposive societal transformation. In particular, we argue that the evolutionary mechanism of selection is the key to introducing the strong directionality required for purposive transformative change. In all three innovation theories, we find that the prime selection environment is constituted by the market and, thus, normative societal goals like sustainability are sidelined. Consequently, selection is depoliticised and neither strong directionality nor incumbent regime destabilisation are societally steered. Finally, we offer an analytical framework that builds upon a more political conception of selection and retention and calls for new political institutions to make normatively guided selections. Institutions for transformative innovation need to improve the capacities of complex societies to make binding decisions in politically contested fields. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental innovation; sustainability transition; transformation; evolutionary economics; multi-level perspective; innovation systems; long-wave theory; agency; decision-making; institutions environmental innovation; sustainability transition; transformation; evolutionary economics; multi-level perspective; innovation systems; long-wave theory; agency; decision-making; institutions
MDPI and ACS Style

Hausknost, D.; Haas, W. The Politics of Selection: Towards a Transformative Model of Environmental Innovation. Sustainability 2019, 11, 506.

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