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Open AccessArticle

Demolition of Existing Buildings in Urban Renewal Projects: A Decision Support System in the China Context

1
School of Public Administration, Zhejiang University of Finance and Economics, Hangzhou 310018, China
2
Department of Building and Real Estate, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon 999077, Hong Kong, China
3
School of Construction Management and Real Estate, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China
4
School of Architecture and Built Environment, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 491; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020491
Received: 15 December 2018 / Revised: 11 January 2019 / Accepted: 14 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Renewal and Built Heritage Management)
Much of the rapid urbanization of China’s cities has occurred at the expense of the existing urban fabric. Across the nation, whole city blocks have been replaced with new structures, requiring large numbers of buildings to be demolished while still serviceable. This curtailed lifespan of existing buildings not only comes with an economic cost, but results in loss of urban culture, wastes resources, degrades the environment, exacerbates pollution, and inflames social conflict and instability. For the purpose of evaluating the merits of building demolition, this study develops a decision support system (DSS) for building demolition in the China context from the perspective of sustainable urban renewal. The indicators of this system cover economic, social, environmental, and institutional aspects of sustainable development. Meanwhile, both the individual characteristics of buildings and the external or extrinsic indicators at the neighborhood, local, or city level are taken into account. Based on exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), 24 critical indicators containing qualitative and quantitative factors are identified. These indicators are classified into six parameters: (1) service performance; (2) economic impact; (3) social identity; (4) local development; (5) building location; and (6) building safety. Empirical results reveal considerations of local development to be of greatest significance with the value of standardized factor loading standing at 0.911, followed by service performance (loading = 0.870) and building location (loading = 0.863), with social identity (loading = 0.236) ranking substantially lower. The findings contribute to the practice of urban renewal and, in particular, provide practical guidance to the building demolition decision-making process. View Full-Text
Keywords: building demolition; decision support system (DDS); confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); urban renewal; sustainable development building demolition; decision support system (DDS); confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); urban renewal; sustainable development
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MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, K.; Shen, G.Q.; Liu, G.; Martek, I. Demolition of Existing Buildings in Urban Renewal Projects: A Decision Support System in the China Context. Sustainability 2019, 11, 491. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020491

AMA Style

Xu K, Shen GQ, Liu G, Martek I. Demolition of Existing Buildings in Urban Renewal Projects: A Decision Support System in the China Context. Sustainability. 2019; 11(2):491. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020491

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xu, Kexi; Shen, Geoffrey Q.; Liu, Guiwen; Martek, Igor. 2019. "Demolition of Existing Buildings in Urban Renewal Projects: A Decision Support System in the China Context" Sustainability 11, no. 2: 491. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020491

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