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Open AccessArticle

“We Are Prisoners in Our Own Homes”: Connecting the Environment, Gender-Based Violence and Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights to Sport for Development and Peace in Nicaragua

1
School of Kinesiology and Health Science, Faculty of Health, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
2
Independent Scholar, Rivas, Nicaragua
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(16), 4485; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164485
Received: 9 July 2019 / Revised: 12 August 2019 / Accepted: 14 August 2019 / Published: 19 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport and Sustainability)
This paper draws on postcolonial feminist political ecology theory, feminist theories of violence and new materialist approaches to sport and physical cultural studies—combined with literature on the role of non-humans in international development—to unpack the connections between gender-based violence and the environment in sport, gender and development (SGD) programming in Nicaragua. To do this, postcolonial feminist participatory action research (PFPAR), including visual research methods such as photovoice, was used to better understand, and prioritize, young Nicaraguan women’s experiences of the environment and gender-based violence as they participated in an SGD program used to promote environmentalism and improve their sexual and reproductive health rights. To conclude, the importance of accounting for the broader physical environment in social and political forces was underlined as it shapes the lives of those on the receiving end of SGD interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: sport for development and peace; sport gender and development; environment; sustainability; gender-based violence; sexual and reproductive health; postcolonial feminist theory; political ecology; participatory action research sport for development and peace; sport gender and development; environment; sustainability; gender-based violence; sexual and reproductive health; postcolonial feminist theory; political ecology; participatory action research
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Hayhurst, L.M.C.; del Socorro Cruz Centeno, L. “We Are Prisoners in Our Own Homes”: Connecting the Environment, Gender-Based Violence and Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights to Sport for Development and Peace in Nicaragua. Sustainability 2019, 11, 4485.

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