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Open AccessArticle

Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index Decomposition of CO2 Emissions from Urban Passenger Transport: An Empirical Study of Global Cities from 1960–2001

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College of Transportation Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804, China
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Key Laboratory of Road Traffic Engineering of the Ministry of Education, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804, China
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Laboratory LIVIC, IFSTTAR, 25 allée des Marronniers, 78000 Versailles, France
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Seazen Holdings Co., Ltd., No.6 Lane 388, Zhongjiang Road, Putuo District, Shanghai 200062, China
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China Merchants Bank, 686, Lai’an road, Shanghai 201201, China
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(16), 4310; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164310
Received: 5 July 2019 / Revised: 4 August 2019 / Accepted: 5 August 2019 / Published: 9 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Transportation for Sustainable Cities)
The urban transport sector has become one of the major contributors to global CO2 emissions. This paper investigates the driving forces of changes in CO2 emissions from the passenger transport sectors in different cities, which is helpful for formulating effective carbon-reduction policies and strategies. The logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) method is used to decompose the CO2 emissions changes into five driving determinants: Urbanization level, motorization level, mode structure, energy intensity, and energy mix. First, the urban transport CO2 emissions between 1960 and 2001 from 46 global cities are calculated. Then, the multiplicative decomposition results for megacities (London, New York, Paris, and Tokyo) are compared with those of other cities. Moreover, additive decomposition analyses of the 4 megacities are conducted to explore the driving forces of changes in CO2 emissions from the passenger transport sectors in these megacities between 1960 and 2001. Based on the decomposition results, some effective carbon-reduction strategies can be formulated for developing cities experiencing rapid urbanization and motorization. The main suggestions are as follows: (i) Rational land use, such as transit-oriented development, is a feasible way to control the trip distance per capita; (ii) fuel economy policies and standards formulated when there are oil crisis are effective ways to suppress the increase of CO2 emissions, and these changes should not be abandoned when oil prices fall; and (iii) cities with high population densities should focus on the development of public and non-motorized transport. View Full-Text
Keywords: CO2 emissions; urban transport; LMDI; megacity CO2 emissions; urban transport; LMDI; megacity
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Tu, M.; Li, Y.; Bao, L.; Wei, Y.; Orfila, O.; Li, W.; Gruyer, D. Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index Decomposition of CO2 Emissions from Urban Passenger Transport: An Empirical Study of Global Cities from 1960–2001. Sustainability 2019, 11, 4310.

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