Next Article in Journal
A Hybrid Model Based on Principal Component Analysis, Wavelet Transform, and Extreme Learning Machine Optimized by Bat Algorithm for Daily Solar Radiation Forecasting
Next Article in Special Issue
From Transition to Domains of Transformation: Getting to Sustainable and Just Food Systems through Agroecology
Previous Article in Journal
The Impact of Foreign Flight Attendants’ Service Quality on Behavioral Intention Toward Their Home Country—Applied SERVPERF Model
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Role of Culture in the Self-Organisation of Coastal Fishers Sustaining Coastal Landscapes: A Case Study in Estonia
Open AccessArticle

Boundary Negotiations in a Self-Organized Grassroots-Led Food Network: The Case of REKO in Finland

1
Department of Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics, 65100 Vaasa, Finland
2
Department of Marketing and Communication, University of Vaasa, 65200 Vaasa, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(15), 4137; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11154137
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 1 July 2019 / Accepted: 16 July 2019 / Published: 31 July 2019
Self-organization is a term that is increasingly used to describe how engaged citizens come together to create sustainable food systems at the local community level. Yet, there is a lack of understanding of what this self-organizing activity actually means. While previous literature has addressed self-organization as an outcome of building consensus and a collective intentionality shared by the members of a group, we focus on the complex social processes involved when people with a diverse set of interests and motivations interact in the food network. In this study, we analyze what kinds of boundary negotiations emerge when grassroots-led food networks scale up. Our embedded single case study focuses on a REKO (‘REjäl KOnsumtion’, meaning ‘fair consumption’ in English) network in Finland comprising distributed local food groups and three types of actors: consumers, producers, and local administrators. We examine a conflict that arose within the REKO network in May–June 2016 when a small group of actors demanded that all local groups should implement similar rules, principles, and ethical standards. Our findings illustrate how moral, geographic, market, and power boundaries emerge in a self-organized grassroots-led food network. We further explicate the challenges that may appear within a self-organized grassroots-led food network, as it grows in scale and scope. View Full-Text
Keywords: alternative food network; boundary negotiation; grassroots innovation; food ethics; self-organizing community; sustainable food alternative food network; boundary negotiation; grassroots innovation; food ethics; self-organizing community; sustainable food
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ehrnström-Fuentes, M.; Leipämaa-Leskinen, H. Boundary Negotiations in a Self-Organized Grassroots-Led Food Network: The Case of REKO in Finland. Sustainability 2019, 11, 4137. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11154137

AMA Style

Ehrnström-Fuentes M, Leipämaa-Leskinen H. Boundary Negotiations in a Self-Organized Grassroots-Led Food Network: The Case of REKO in Finland. Sustainability. 2019; 11(15):4137. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11154137

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ehrnström-Fuentes, Maria; Leipämaa-Leskinen, Hanna. 2019. "Boundary Negotiations in a Self-Organized Grassroots-Led Food Network: The Case of REKO in Finland" Sustainability 11, no. 15: 4137. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11154137

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop