Next Article in Journal
A Comparison of a Smart City’s Trends in Urban Planning before and after 2016 through Keyword Network Analysis
Next Article in Special Issue
Construction and Demolition Waste in Romania: The Route from Illegal Dumping to Building Materials
Previous Article in Journal
Selective Elimination of Parental Chromatin from Introgression Cultivars of xFestulolium (Festuca × Lolium)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Dynamic Incentive Mechanism Design for Recycling Construction and Demolition Waste under Dual Information Asymmetry
Open AccessArticle

Realizing the Circular Economy for Sanitation: Assessing Enabling Conditions and Barriers to the Commercialization of Human Excreta Derived Fertilizer in Haiti and Kenya

School of Water, Energy and Environment, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(11), 3154; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113154
Received: 12 April 2019 / Revised: 23 May 2019 / Accepted: 24 May 2019 / Published: 4 June 2019
Efficient fecal sludge management solutions are especially challenging in densely populated urban informal settlements, where space is limited and land tenure uncertain. One solution is to collect and treat human excreta to produce soil conditioners for use in agriculture, through container-based sanitation, thus realizing the circular economy for sanitation. This study focused on container-based sanitation ventures that produce and sell fertilizers from human excreta. Stakeholder interviews showed that challenges faced by these ventures were similar: unclear regulations on the use of fertilizers derived from source-separated excreta, undeveloped markets for organic fertilizers, difficulties in securing secondary sources of organic matter for composting as well as complex transport and distribution logistics. The findings of this study emphasized the need for clear policies with respect to human excreta derived fertilizer, as well as institutional involvement in order to incentivize the sale and use of human excreta derived fertilizer locally to ensure that sustainable and safely managed sanitation systems are available in urban areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: fertilizer; sanitation; fecal sludge; business models; certifications fertilizer; sanitation; fecal sludge; business models; certifications
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Moya, B.; Sakrabani, R.; Parker, A. Realizing the Circular Economy for Sanitation: Assessing Enabling Conditions and Barriers to the Commercialization of Human Excreta Derived Fertilizer in Haiti and Kenya. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3154.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop