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Open AccessEditorial

Hawai‘i in Focus: Navigating Pathways in Global Biocultural Leadership

1
Kua‘āina Ulu ‘Auamo, Kāne‘ohe, HI 96744, USA
2
Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Kāne‘ohe, HI 96744, USA
3
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
4
National Tropical Botanical Garden, Kalāheo, HI 96741, USA
5
Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(1), 283; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11010283
Received: 2 January 2019 / Accepted: 4 January 2019 / Published: 8 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocultural Restoration in Hawaiʻi)
As an introduction to the special issue on “Biocultural Restoration in Hawai‘i,” this manuscript provides background for term ‘biocultural restoration,’ and contextualizes it within the realms of scholarship and conservation. It explores two key themes related to the topic. First, “Earth as Island, Island as Earth,” scales up an island-borne concept of sustainability into a global context. Second, “Hawai‘i as a Biocultural Leader,” examines the reasons behind the global trend of looking to the most isolated landmass on the planet for solutions to global sustainability issues. We conclude by summarizing the content of the special issue and pointing out the historic nature of its publication. It is the largest collection to date of scientific papers authored by Native Hawaiians and kama‘āina (Hawai‘i-grown) scholars, and more than 50% of both lead and total authorship are women. This Special Issue, therefore, represents a big step forward for under-represented demographics in science. It also solidifies, as embodied in many of the papers in this Special Issue, indigenous methodologies that prioritize working relationships and practical applications by directly involving those on the front lines of biocultural conservation and restoration. View Full-Text
Keywords: Native Hawaiian; social-ecological system; agro-ecology; ‘āina momona Native Hawaiian; social-ecological system; agro-ecology; ‘āina momona
MDPI and ACS Style

Chang, K.; Winter, K.B.; Lincoln, N.K. Hawai‘i in Focus: Navigating Pathways in Global Biocultural Leadership. Sustainability 2019, 11, 283. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11010283

AMA Style

Chang K, Winter KB, Lincoln NK. Hawai‘i in Focus: Navigating Pathways in Global Biocultural Leadership. Sustainability. 2019; 11(1):283. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11010283

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chang, Kevin; Winter, Kawika B.; Lincoln, Noa K. 2019. "Hawai‘i in Focus: Navigating Pathways in Global Biocultural Leadership" Sustainability 11, no. 1: 283. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11010283

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