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Open AccessArticle

Soil CO2 and N2O Emission Drivers in a Vineyard (Vitis vinifera) under Different Soil Management Systems and Amendments

Institute of Soil Sciences and Agricultural Chemistry, Centre for Agricultural Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Herman O. St. 15, Budapest 1022, Hungary
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Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 1811; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061811
Received: 21 April 2018 / Revised: 28 May 2018 / Accepted: 29 May 2018 / Published: 31 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife)
Greenhouse gases emitted from agricultural soils entering the atmosphere must be reduced to decrease negative impacts on the environment. As soil management can have an influence on greenhouse gas emissions, we investigated the effects of different soil management systems and enhancer materials on CO2 and N2O fluxes in a vineyard. Five treatments were investigated: (i) no-till management with no fertilizer addition as the control (C); (ii) tilled soil (shallow) with no fertilizer (T); (iii) tilled soil, no fertilizer, and biochar application (T + BC); (iv) tilled soil and manure addition (T + M); and (v) tilled soil, manure, and biochar application (T + M + BC). T treatment showed the highest overall N2O emission, while the lowest was observed in the case of T + M + BC, while manure and biochar addition decreased. Tillage in general increased overall CO2 emissions in all treatments (T 26.7% and T + BC 30.0% higher CO2 than C), while manure addition resulted in reduced soil respiration values (T + M 23.0% and T + M + BC 24.8% lower CO2 than T). There were no strong correlations between temperatures or soil water contents and N2O emissions, while in terms of CO2 emissions, weak to moderately strong connections were observed with environmental drivers. View Full-Text
Keywords: greenhouse gases; tillage; fertilizer; organic manure; biochar; soil moisture; soil temperature greenhouse gases; tillage; fertilizer; organic manure; biochar; soil moisture; soil temperature
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Horel, Á.; Tóth, E.; Gelybó, G.; Dencső, M.; Potyó, I. Soil CO2 and N2O Emission Drivers in a Vineyard (Vitis vinifera) under Different Soil Management Systems and Amendments. Sustainability 2018, 10, 1811.

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