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Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1646; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051646

A Framework for Tracing Social–Ecological Trajectories and Traps in Intensive Agricultural Landscapes

1
Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583, USA
2
U.S. Geological Survey, Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583, USA
3
Biological Systems Engineering Department, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583, USA
4
Public Policy Center, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 January 2018 / Revised: 23 March 2018 / Accepted: 10 April 2018 / Published: 20 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources)
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Abstract

Charting trajectories toward sustainable agricultural development is an important goal at the food–energy–water–ecosystem services (FEWES) nexus of agricultural landscapes. Social–ecological adaptation and transformation are two broad strategies for adjusting and resetting the trajectories of productive FEWES nexuses toward sustainable futures. In some cases, financial incentives, technological innovations, and/or subsidies associated with the short-term optimization of a small number of resources create and strengthen unsustainable feedbacks between social and ecological entities at the FEWES nexus. These feedbacks form the basis of rigidity traps, which impede adaptation and transformation by locking FEWES nexuses into unsustainable trajectories characterized by control, stability, and efficiency, but also an inability to adapt to disturbances or changing conditions. To escape and avoid rigidity traps and enable sustainability-focused adaptation and transformation, a foundational understanding of FEWES nexuses and their unique trajectories and traps is required. We present a framework for tracing trajectories and traps at the FEWES nexuses of intensive agricultural landscapes. Framework implementation in a case study reveals feedbacks characteristic of rigidity traps, as well as opportunities for modifying and dissolving them. Such place-based understanding could inform sustainable agricultural development at the FEWES nexus of intensive agricultural landscapes worldwide. View Full-Text
Keywords: agriculture; feedbacks; governance; management; resilience; rigidity; social–ecological systems; sustainable agricultural development agriculture; feedbacks; governance; management; resilience; rigidity; social–ecological systems; sustainable agricultural development
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Uden, D.R.; Allen, C.R.; Munoz-Arriola, F.; Ou, G.; Shank, N. A Framework for Tracing Social–Ecological Trajectories and Traps in Intensive Agricultural Landscapes. Sustainability 2018, 10, 1646.

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