Next Article in Journal
Liquid-Phase Respiration Activity Assays to Assess Organic Waste Stability: A Comparison of Two Tests
Next Article in Special Issue
Historical and Empirical Basis for Communal Title in Minerals at the National Level: Does Ownership Matter for Human Development?
Previous Article in Journal
Construction of the Belt and Road Trade Cooperation Network from the Multi-Distances Perspective
Previous Article in Special Issue
“Slowing” and “Narrowing” the Flow of Metals for Consumer Goods: Evaluating Opportunities and Barriers
Open AccessArticle

Estimating Residential Electricity Consumption in Nigeria to Support Energy Transitions

Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1440; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051440
Received: 27 February 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 3 May 2018 / Published: 5 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in the Mining, Minerals and Energy Industries)
Considering the challenge of accessing reliable household metering data in Nigeria, how can electricity consumption levels be determined? And how do disparities in electricity consumption patterns across the country affect the pursuit of sustainability, universal access and energy transition objectives? This study combined household-reported data on ownership of electrical appliances and energy expenditure with online sales records of household appliances to estimate current and future residential electricity demand in Nigeria, as well as the required generation capacity to achieve 100% electricity access, under various scenarios. Median residential electricity consumption was estimated at 18–27 kWh per capita but these estimates vary between the geographical zones with the North East and South West representing extremes. Under a universal access scenario, the future electricity supply system would be expected to have installed generation capacity sufficient to meet the estimated residential demand of 85 TWh. To further understand the required infrastructure investment as a whole and the approaches that might be preferred in rural versus urban areas, the disaggregated, zone-by-zone and urban/rural data may offer more insight than a whole-of-country approach. The data obtained is useful for identifying specific transitions at the sub-national level that can minimize the required investment while maximizing households’ energy access. View Full-Text
Keywords: electricity access; energy transition; sustainability; household survey; Nigeria electricity access; energy transition; sustainability; household survey; Nigeria
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Olaniyan, K.; McLellan, B.C.; Ogata, S.; Tezuka, T. Estimating Residential Electricity Consumption in Nigeria to Support Energy Transitions. Sustainability 2018, 10, 1440. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051440

AMA Style

Olaniyan K, McLellan BC, Ogata S, Tezuka T. Estimating Residential Electricity Consumption in Nigeria to Support Energy Transitions. Sustainability. 2018; 10(5):1440. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051440

Chicago/Turabian Style

Olaniyan, Kayode; McLellan, Benjamin C.; Ogata, Seiichi; Tezuka, Tetsuo. 2018. "Estimating Residential Electricity Consumption in Nigeria to Support Energy Transitions" Sustainability 10, no. 5: 1440. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051440

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop