Next Article in Journal
Landfill Site Selection by Weighted Overlay Technique: Case Study of Al-Kufa, Iraq
Next Article in Special Issue
Social Sustainability through Social Interaction—A National Survey on Community Gardens in Germany
Previous Article in Journal
Consumer Attitudes toward Sustainable Development and Risk to Brand Loyalty
Previous Article in Special Issue
Typically Diverse: The Nature of Urban Agriculture in South Australia
Open AccessArticle

From Cascade to Bottom-Up Ecosystem Services Model: How Does Social Cohesion Emerge from Urban Agriculture?

by Anna Petit-Boix 1,2,* and Defne Apul 3
1
Chair of Societal Transition and Circular Economy, University of Freiburg. Tennenbacher Str. 4, 79106 Freiburg i. Br., Germany
2
Sostenipra, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA), Unidad de excelencia «María de Maeztu» (MDM-2015-0552), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain
3
Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Toledo, OH 43606, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 998; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10040998
Received: 13 February 2018 / Revised: 19 March 2018 / Accepted: 26 March 2018 / Published: 28 March 2018
Given the expansion of urban agriculture (UA), we need to understand how this system provides ecosystem services, including foundational societal needs such as social cohesion, i.e., people’s willingness to cooperate with one another. Although social cohesion in UA has been documented, there is no framework for its emergence and how it can be modeled within a sustainability framework. In this study, we address this literature gap by showing how the popular cascade ecosystem services model can be modified to include social structures. We then transform the cascade model into a bottom-up causal framework for UA. In this bottom-up framework, basic biophysical (e.g., land availability) and social (e.g., leadership) ecosystem structures and processes lead to human activities (e.g., learning) that can foster specific human attitudes and feelings (e.g., trust). These attitudes and feelings, when aggregated (e.g., social network), generate an ecosystem value of social cohesion. These cause-effect relationships can support the development of causality pathways in social life cycle assessment (S-LCA) and further our understanding of the mechanisms behind social impacts and benefits. The framework also supports UA studies by showing the sustainability of UA as an emergent food supplier in cities. View Full-Text
Keywords: cultural ecosystem services; benefits; emergent behavior; life cycle assessment; sustainability assessment cultural ecosystem services; benefits; emergent behavior; life cycle assessment; sustainability assessment
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Petit-Boix, A.; Apul, D. From Cascade to Bottom-Up Ecosystem Services Model: How Does Social Cohesion Emerge from Urban Agriculture? Sustainability 2018, 10, 998.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop