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Article

Impacts of Changing Forest Management Areas on Forest Landscapes and Habitat Patterns in Northeastern China

1
Jangho Architecture College, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819, China
2
Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Management, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China
3
Center for Studies of Marine Economy and Sustainable Development, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian 116029, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1211; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041211
Received: 21 January 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 April 2018 / Published: 17 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Sustainability and Applications)
The management of multi-use forests often drives forest fragmentation, which leads to decreased habitat areas and quality. We explored suitable habitat distributions of cervids to evaluate the conflict between small-scale human management and large-scale habitat conservation in human-disturbed forest landscapes. We estimated the potential habitat of roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) and determined the contribution of multiple environmental factors to habitat distribution using the presence of roe deer (N = 106) in a maximum entropy (MaxEnt) model. We simulated changes in the suitable habitat and characteristics of landscape patterns based on three forest management area scenarios. The results showed that the potential suitable habitat for roe deer was located mainly in the east. The variables affecting habitat suitability were similar in different scenarios, and included distance to farmland, settlements, rivers and management areas, and elevation. Distance to the management area was found to affect habitat suitability with a contribution probability from 4% to 6%. With an increase in the management area, the suitable habitat decreased. Landscape indexes showed that habitat quality decreased with management area expansion, but patch fragmentation was not aggravated. The expansion of the management area increased the range of human disturbance and had a negative impact on habitat area and quality, which adversely affected the environmental suitability for roe deer. View Full-Text
Keywords: national forest; forest management; suitable habitat; species distribution models; roe deer national forest; forest management; suitable habitat; species distribution models; roe deer
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wu, W.; Li, Y.; Hu, Y.; Xiu, C.; Yan, X. Impacts of Changing Forest Management Areas on Forest Landscapes and Habitat Patterns in Northeastern China. Sustainability 2018, 10, 1211. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041211

AMA Style

Wu W, Li Y, Hu Y, Xiu C, Yan X. Impacts of Changing Forest Management Areas on Forest Landscapes and Habitat Patterns in Northeastern China. Sustainability. 2018; 10(4):1211. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041211

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wu, Wen, Yuehui Li, Yuanman Hu, Chunliang Xiu, and Xiaolu Yan. 2018. "Impacts of Changing Forest Management Areas on Forest Landscapes and Habitat Patterns in Northeastern China" Sustainability 10, no. 4: 1211. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041211

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