Next Article in Journal
Daytime Lighting Assessment in Textile Factories Using Connected Windows in Slovakia: A Case Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Case Study Analysing Potentials to Improve Material Efficiency in Manufacturing Supply Chains, Considering Circular Economy Aspects
Previous Article in Journal
An Exploratory Study of Cooperative Survival: Strategic Adaptation to External Developments
Previous Article in Special Issue
Mapping the Landscape and Evolutions of Green Supply Chain Management
Article Menu
Issue 3 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 653; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030653

Tackling Fragmented Last Mile Deliveries to Nanostores by Utilizing Spare Transportation Capacity—A Simulation Study

1
MOBI—Mobility, Logistics and Automotive Technology Research Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium
2
Logistics Research Group, UHasselt, Agoralaan, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium
3
Research Foundation Flanders (FWO), Egmontstraat 5, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 December 2017 / Revised: 12 February 2018 / Accepted: 23 February 2018 / Published: 28 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Supply Chains)
Full-Text   |   PDF [1196 KB, uploaded 2 March 2018]   |  

Abstract

Last mile deliveries in urban areas cause a disproportionate unsustainable impact, while it is also the most expensive part of the supply chain. This is particularly true for freight flows that are characterized by fragmentation. Logistically, this becomes apparent in vehicles that are driving around with a low vehicle fill rate, leading to the unnecessary presence of freight vehicles in our cities. This study focuses on the operational feasibility of utilizing the spare transportation capacity of a service-driven company as a potential solution to supply small independent retailers, or nanostores. The aim is to reduce inefficient vehicle movement. Based on a real-life implementation, we use SYnchronization Model for Belgian Inland Transport (SYMBIT), an agent-based model, to simulate various bundling scenarios. Results show the total vehicle kilometers and lead times to supply nanostores for the service-driven company to serve its customers. There is a potential to utilize spare capacity to supply nanostores while maintaining a decent service level. The number of vehicle kilometers driven highly depends on the location of the distribution center where the service-driven company operates. Based on these results, the conditions that have to be met to replicate this solution in other urban areas are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: last mile; urban freight transport; inefficiency; fragmentation; spare transportation capacity; nanostores; citylab; SYMBIT; agent-based modeling; ABM; Geographic Information System; GIS; discrete-event model; DEM last mile; urban freight transport; inefficiency; fragmentation; spare transportation capacity; nanostores; citylab; SYMBIT; agent-based modeling; ABM; Geographic Information System; GIS; discrete-event model; DEM
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Kin, B.; Ambra, T.; Verlinde, S.; Macharis, C. Tackling Fragmented Last Mile Deliveries to Nanostores by Utilizing Spare Transportation Capacity—A Simulation Study. Sustainability 2018, 10, 653.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top