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Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4755; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124755

Beyond Food Security: Challenges in Food Safety Policies and Governance along a Heterogeneous Agri-Food Chain and Its Effects on Health Measures and Sustainable Development in Mexico

1
Graduate School of Business, Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, 72410 Puebla, Mexico
2
Graduate School of Engineering, Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, 72410 Puebla, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 October 2018 / Revised: 26 November 2018 / Accepted: 11 December 2018 / Published: 13 December 2018
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Abstract

This work describes the relevance of food policies and governance to reach food safety issues along a heterogeneous food chain, in the context of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) food security definition. Using personal interviews with agents in the food chain, and secondary data from 2014–2018, this exploratory research demonstrated that: (a) Mexican food policies regarding food safety are oriented to the exports markets and/or high income producers-consumers; (b) this has split the agri-food chain in two: one serving international and/or high income consumers, and another serving domestic markets; (c) the agri-food chain that serves domestic markets experiences regulatory budget shortfalls, lacks coordination in food regulations across its agents, and brings about alternate informal markets that put peoples’ health and financial stability at risk, especially those lower-income consumers. Only 0.7% of producers, 12.5% of supermarkets and 42.8% of restaurants have some type of food safety certifications. This is worsened by the way public resources have been distributed, focused, prioritized, and planned. If the differences between big, medium and small producers continue to increase, it will increase regional and individual inequality, leading to two different countries: one developed and one developing, challenging its sustainable development. View Full-Text
Keywords: domestic markets; small producers; retailers; informal restaurants; low-income population; federal budget; externally oriented production; out of home food; inequalities; food certifications domestic markets; small producers; retailers; informal restaurants; low-income population; federal budget; externally oriented production; out of home food; inequalities; food certifications
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Mayett-Moreno, Y.; López Oglesby, J.M. Beyond Food Security: Challenges in Food Safety Policies and Governance along a Heterogeneous Agri-Food Chain and Its Effects on Health Measures and Sustainable Development in Mexico. Sustainability 2018, 10, 4755.

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