Next Article in Journal
Operating Efficiency Evaluation of China Listed Automotive Firms: 2012–2016
Previous Article in Journal
The Sustainable Seafood Movement Is a Governance Concert, with the Audience Playing a Key Role
Previous Article in Special Issue
Seasonal and Diurnal Characteristics of Land Surface Temperature and Major Explanatory Factors in Harris County, Texas
Open AccessReview

The Race to Document Archaeological Sites Ahead of Rising Sea Levels: Recent Applications of Geospatial Technologies in the Archaeology of Polynesia

Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University, P.O. Box 750336, Dallas, TX 75275-0336, USA
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010185
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 10 January 2018 / Accepted: 11 January 2018 / Published: 13 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geospatial Technologies for Sustainable Natural Resources)
Marine environments are rich in natural resources, and therefore, have been targeted for human occupation from at least the Pleistocene. In the modern day, the preservation and documentation of the physical archaeological evidence of human occupation and use of coasts, islands, and the ocean must now include mitigating the impacts of global climate change. Here, I review recent efforts to document archaeological sites across the islands of Polynesia using geospatial technology, specifically remote sensing, high-resolution documentation, and the creation of archaeological site geodatabases. I discuss these geospatial technologies in terms of planning for likely future impacts from sea level rise; a problem that will be felt across the region, and based on current evidence, will affect more than 12% of all known sites in New Zealand (Aotearoa). View Full-Text
Keywords: geospatial technologies; global environmental change; archaeology; Pacific Ocean geospatial technologies; global environmental change; archaeology; Pacific Ocean
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

McCoy, M.D. The Race to Document Archaeological Sites Ahead of Rising Sea Levels: Recent Applications of Geospatial Technologies in the Archaeology of Polynesia. Sustainability 2018, 10, 185.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop