Next Article in Journal
The Race to Document Archaeological Sites Ahead of Rising Sea Levels: Recent Applications of Geospatial Technologies in the Archaeology of Polynesia
Next Article in Special Issue
Flame Retardant Contamination and Seafood Sustainability
Previous Article in Journal
An Algorithm for Modelling the Impact of the Judicial Conflict-Resolution Process on Construction Investment
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010180

The Sustainable Seafood Movement Is a Governance Concert, with the Audience Playing a Key Role

1
School of International Studies, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Technology Sydney (UTS), P.O. Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007, Australia
2
BESTTuna Project, Environmental Policy Group, Wageningen University (WUR), Hollandseweg 1, 6706KN Wageningen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 November 2017 / Revised: 13 December 2017 / Accepted: 4 January 2018 / Published: 12 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seafood Sustainability)
Full-Text   |   PDF [1572 KB, uploaded 12 January 2018]   |  

Abstract

Private standards, including ecolabels, have been posed as a governance solution for the global fisheries crisis. The conventional logic is that ecolabels meet consumer demand for certified “sustainable” seafood, with “good” players rewarded with price premiums or market share and “bad” players punished by reduced sales. Empirically, however, in the markets where ecolabeling has taken hold, retailers and brands—rather than consumers—are demanding sustainable sourcing, to build and protect their reputation. The aim of this paper is to devise a more accurate logic for understanding the sustainable seafood movement, using a qualitative literature review and reflection on our previous research. We find that replacing the consumer-driven logic with a retailer/brand-driven logic does not go far enough in making research into the sustainable seafood movement more useful. Governance is a “concert” and cannot be adequately explained through individual actor groups. We propose a new logic going beyond consumer- or retailer/brand-driven models, and call on researchers to build on the partial pictures given by studies on prices and willingness-to-pay, investigating more fully the motivations of actors in the sustainable seafood movement, and considering audience beyond the direct consumption of the product in question. View Full-Text
Keywords: corporate social responsibility; ecolabels; ethical consumption; green marketing; supply chain management; sustainable seafood corporate social responsibility; ecolabels; ethical consumption; green marketing; supply chain management; sustainable seafood
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Barclay, K.; Miller, A. The Sustainable Seafood Movement Is a Governance Concert, with the Audience Playing a Key Role. Sustainability 2018, 10, 180.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top