Next Article in Journal
Improving Eco-Efficiency through Waste Reduction beyond the Boundaries of a Firm: Evidence from a Multiplant Case in the Ceramic Industry
Previous Article in Journal
System Dynamics of Polysilicon for Solar Photovoltaics: A Framework for Investigating the Energy Security of Renewable Energy Supply Chains
Open AccessArticle

Phosphorus Availability in Wheat, in Volcanic Soils Inoculated with Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacillus thuringiensis

1
Department of Soils and Natural Resources, Faculty of Agronomy, Universidad de Concepción, Campus Chillan, Avenida Vicente Méndez 595, P.O. Box 537, Chillán 3812120, Chile
2
Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, INIA Quilamapu, Avenida Vicente Méndez 515, Chillán 3812120, Chile
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Estação Experimental Agrícola da Chianga (EEAC), Instituto de Investigação Agronómica (IIA), Ministério da Agricultura e Desenvolvimento Rural, Luanda, Angola.
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010144
Received: 25 October 2017 / Revised: 19 December 2017 / Accepted: 3 January 2018 / Published: 11 January 2018
The use of phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) is an ecological strategy that allows for increasing the availability of phosphorus (P) in soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate P availability in wheat, in soils derived from volcanic ash (Andisol and Ultisol,) and inoculated with phosphate-solubilizing Bacillus thuringiensis, the experiment was conducted in pots under greenhouse conditions using a completely randomized design. Wheat plants were inoculated and re-inoculated at 20 and 46 days after sowing (DAS), respectively, with B. thuringiensis; and, soil and plant sampling was performed after 46, 66, and 87 days based on the Zadoks growth scale (Z). The inoculation resulted in an 11% increase in P of the rhizosphere at Z46 (Ultisol), P also increased 34% and 67% in aerial tissues at Z46 (Andisol and Ultisol), respectively, while an increase of 75% was observed in root tissues at Z87 (Ultisol). Similarly, the inoculation resulted in increases in acid phosphatase activity (Andisol), soil microbial biomass (Andisol and Ultisol), and root biomass in plants (Ultisol), without achieving increase of the aerial biomass of the plants. The phosphate solubilizing B. thuringiensis strain showed some positive, but also negative effects in soils and plants, depending on the soil. View Full-Text
Keywords: phosphate solubilization; rhizosphere; phosphorus availability; volcanic soils; Bacillus thuringiensis phosphate solubilization; rhizosphere; phosphorus availability; volcanic soils; Bacillus thuringiensis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Delfim, J.; Schoebitz, M.; Paulino, L.; Hirzel, J.; Zagal, E. Phosphorus Availability in Wheat, in Volcanic Soils Inoculated with Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacillus thuringiensis. Sustainability 2018, 10, 144.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop