Next Article in Journal
Efficient Transfection of Large Plasmids Encoding HIV-1 into Human Cells—A High Potential Transfection System Based on a Peptide Mimicking Cationic Lipid
Previous Article in Journal
Verification of P-Glycoprotein Function at the Dermal Barrier in Diffusion Cells and Dynamic “Skin-On-A-Chip” Microfluidic Device
Open AccessArticle

A Novel Oral Syringe for Dosing and Administration of Multiparticulate Formulations: Acceptability Study in Preschool and School Children

1
School of Pharmacy, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
2
Pfizer Global R&D, Sandwich, Kent CT13 9NJ, UK
3
Pfizer Global R&D, Groton, CT 06340, USA
4
Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(9), 806; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12090806
Received: 5 August 2020 / Revised: 19 August 2020 / Accepted: 20 August 2020 / Published: 25 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Physical Pharmacy and Formulation)
The popularity of multiparticulate formulations (MPs) as a paediatric dosage form continues to increase. MPs comprise of multiple small units that are easy-to-swallow. Currently, MPs are commonly manufactured into unit doses that are either swallowed whole or opened prior to administration. While this is an acceptable approach, dosing is envisioned to be optimised with a “standard” paediatric device which can better harness the flexible dosing potential of MPs. We evaluated a novel oral syringe (SympfinyTM, HS Design, Morristown, NJ, USA) that is being developed as a tool to dispense and administer MPs to children. Forty children, 4–12 years old, received 0.5, 1.2, and 2.0 mL doses of placebo MPs using the oral syringe with spring water or a drink of choice to complete sample intake. Acceptability was recorded as those able to completely swallow the dose and participants also rated dose acceptability on a 5-point scale. The ability to completely swallow the dose decreased as dose volume increased; the smallest dose was completely swallowed by 87.5% (35/40) children, and 69.4% (27/39) of children confirmed their willingness to take the sample as a daily medicine. Larger doses, 1.2 and 2.0 mL, gave values of 55% and 57.5% for the doses completely swallowed and 58.8% and 51.72% for willingness to take the sample as a daily medicine, respectively. Use of a drink of choice showed no increase in swallowability as compared with water. The novel oral syringe being developed is an appropriate device for dispensing doses flexibly and administering neutral tasting MPs directly to the mouth in the lower dose range without the need for a co-administration vehicle in children aged 4–12 years. View Full-Text
Keywords: multiparticulates; administration device; acceptability; paediatric formulation; mouthfeel; oral syringe multiparticulates; administration device; acceptability; paediatric formulation; mouthfeel; oral syringe
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Katarzyna Hofmanová, J.; Bennett, J.; Coupe, A.; A. Bartlett, J.; Monahan, A.; Batchelor, H.K. A Novel Oral Syringe for Dosing and Administration of Multiparticulate Formulations: Acceptability Study in Preschool and School Children. Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 806. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12090806

AMA Style

Katarzyna Hofmanová J, Bennett J, Coupe A, A. Bartlett J, Monahan A, Batchelor HK. A Novel Oral Syringe for Dosing and Administration of Multiparticulate Formulations: Acceptability Study in Preschool and School Children. Pharmaceutics. 2020; 12(9):806. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12090806

Chicago/Turabian Style

Katarzyna Hofmanová, Justyna; Bennett, Joanne; Coupe, Alastair; A. Bartlett, Jeremy; Monahan, Andrew; Batchelor, Hannah K. 2020. "A Novel Oral Syringe for Dosing and Administration of Multiparticulate Formulations: Acceptability Study in Preschool and School Children" Pharmaceutics 12, no. 9: 806. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12090806

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop