Next Article in Journal
What Are the Current Approaches to Optimising Antimicrobial Dosing in the Intensive Care Unit?
Next Article in Special Issue
Optimized Polyethylene Glycolylated Polymer–Lipid Hybrid Nanoparticles as a Potential Breast Cancer Treatment
Previous Article in Journal
In-Depth Study into Polymeric Materials in Low-Density Gastroretentive Formulations
Previous Article in Special Issue
Tumor-Targeting Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles for Image-Guided Surgery of Rabbit Orthotopic VX2 Lung Cancer
Open AccessArticle

Evaluation of Novel Doxorubicin-Loaded Magnetic Wax Nanocomposite Vehicles as Cancer Combinatorial Therapy Agents

1
Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIM9090325ER), Center of Biomedical Research (CIBM), University of Granada, 18014 Granada, Spain
2
Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, 18014 Granada, Spain
3
Biosanitary Institute of Granada (ibs.GRANADA), University of Granada, 18014 Granada, Spain
4
Advanced (Magnetic) Theranostic Nanostructures Lab, Health Cluster, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Av. Mestre José Veiga s/n, 4715-330 Braga, Portugal
5
The Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, the BioRobotics Institute, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio 34, Pontedera, 56025 Pisa, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(7), 637; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12070637
Received: 9 June 2020 / Revised: 29 June 2020 / Accepted: 2 July 2020 / Published: 7 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Materials in Drug Delivery System in Oncology)
The development of nanotechnology-based solutions for cancer at a preclinical level advances at an astounding pace. So far, clinical translation of these new developments has not been able to keep the pace due to a range of different reasons. One of them is the mismatch between in vitro and in vivo results coming from the expected difference in complexity. To overcome this problem, extensive characterisation using advanced in vitro models can lead to stronger preliminary data to face in vivo tests. Here, a comprehensive in vitro validation of a combinatorial therapy nanoformulation against solid tumours is presented. The information extracted from the different in vitro models highlights the importance of advanced 3D models to fully understand the potential of this type of complex drugs. View Full-Text
Keywords: magnetic nanocomposites; magnetic hyperthermia; combinatorial therapy; 3D in vitro models; drug delivery magnetic nanocomposites; magnetic hyperthermia; combinatorial therapy; 3D in vitro models; drug delivery
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Jiménez-López, J.; García-Hevia, L.; Melguizo, C.; Prados, J.; Bañobre-López, M.; Gallo, J. Evaluation of Novel Doxorubicin-Loaded Magnetic Wax Nanocomposite Vehicles as Cancer Combinatorial Therapy Agents. Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 637. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12070637

AMA Style

Jiménez-López J, García-Hevia L, Melguizo C, Prados J, Bañobre-López M, Gallo J. Evaluation of Novel Doxorubicin-Loaded Magnetic Wax Nanocomposite Vehicles as Cancer Combinatorial Therapy Agents. Pharmaceutics. 2020; 12(7):637. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12070637

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jiménez-López, Julia; García-Hevia, Lorena; Melguizo, Consolación; Prados, Jose; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Gallo, Juan. 2020. "Evaluation of Novel Doxorubicin-Loaded Magnetic Wax Nanocomposite Vehicles as Cancer Combinatorial Therapy Agents" Pharmaceutics 12, no. 7: 637. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12070637

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop