Next Article in Journal
Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Tiropramide in Healthy Korean Subjects
Next Article in Special Issue
Investigating the Effect of Encapsulation Processing Parameters on the Viability of Therapeutic Viruses in Electrospraying
Previous Article in Journal
Multi-Methodological Quantitative Taste Assessment of Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs to Support the Development of Palatable Paediatric Dosage Forms
Previous Article in Special Issue
Quality by Design Micro-Engineering Optimisation of NSAID-Loaded Electrospun Fibrous Patches
Open AccessArticle

A Portable Device for the Generation of Drug-Loaded Three-Compartmental Fibers Containing Metronidazole and Iodine for Topical Application

1
Medway School of Pharmacy, Universities of Kent and Greenwich, Chatham ME4 4TB, UK
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE, UK
3
Department of Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
4
Department of Physics and Astronomy and London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
5
School of Pharmacy, University College London, 29–39 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AX, UK
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(4), 373; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12040373
Received: 27 February 2020 / Revised: 13 April 2020 / Accepted: 13 April 2020 / Published: 18 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Micro- and Nanofabrication Technologies for Drug Delivery)
The use of combination therapies for the treatment of a range of conditions is now well established, with the component drugs usually being delivered either as distinct medicaments or combination products that contain physical mixes of the two active ingredients. There is, however, a compelling argument for the development of compartmentalised systems whereby the release, stability and incorporation environment of the different drugs may be tailored. Here we outline the development of polymeric fine fiber systems whereby two drugs used for the treatment of wounds may be separately incorporated. Fibers were delivered using a newly developed handheld electrospinning device that allows treatment at the site of need. Crucially, the delivery system is portable and may be used for the administration of drug-loaded fibers directly into the wound in situ, thereby potentially allowing domiciliary or site-of-trauma administration. The three-layered fiber developed in this study has polyethylene glycol as the outermost layer, serving as a structural support for the inner layers. The inner layers comprised iodine complexed with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and metronidazole dispersed in polycaprolactone (PCL) as a slow release core. The systems were characterized in terms of structure and architecture using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and diffractometry. As antibacterial creams are still used for managing infected wounds, the performance of our trilayered fiber was studied in comparison with creams containing similar active drugs. Drug release was measured by UV analysis, while antimicrobial efficiency was measured using agar diffusion and suspension methods. It was found that the trilayered systems, averaging 3.16 µm in diameter, released more drug over the study period and were confirmed by the microbacterial studies to be more effective against P. aeruginosa, a bacterium commonly implicated in infected wounds. Overall, the portable system has been shown to be capable of not only incorporating the two drugs in distinct layers but also of delivering adequate amounts of drugs for a more effective antibacterial activity. The portability of the device and its ability to generate distinct layers of multiple active ingredients make it promising for further development for wound healing applications in terms of both practical applicability and antimicrobial efficacy. View Full-Text
Keywords: trilayered fibers; portable electrospinning; wound dressing; combination therapy; compartmental drug delivery trilayered fibers; portable electrospinning; wound dressing; combination therapy; compartmental drug delivery
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Brako, F.; Luo, C.; Matharu, R.K.; Ciric, L.; Harker, A.; Edirisinghe, M.; Craig, D.Q.M. A Portable Device for the Generation of Drug-Loaded Three-Compartmental Fibers Containing Metronidazole and Iodine for Topical Application. Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 373.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop