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Open AccessReview

Review of Advanced Hydrogel-Based Cell Encapsulation Systems for Insulin Delivery in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

1
NanoBioCel Group, Laboratory of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Paseo de la Universidad 7, 01006 Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
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Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), 01006 Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
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University Institute for Regenerative Medicine and Oral Implantology - UIRMI (UPV/EHU-Fundación Eduardo Anitua), 01006 Vitoria, Spain
4
Singapore Eye Research Institute, The Academia, 20 College Road, Discovery Tower, Singapore 169856, Singapore
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmaceutics 2019, 11(11), 597; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11110597
Received: 18 October 2019 / Revised: 5 November 2019 / Accepted: 6 November 2019 / Published: 12 November 2019
: Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is characterized by the autoimmune destruction of β-cells in the pancreatic islets. In this regard, islet transplantation aims for the replacement of the damaged β-cells through minimally invasive surgical procedures, thereby being the most suitable strategy to cure T1DM. Unfortunately, this procedure still has limitations for its widespread clinical application, including the need for long-term immunosuppression, the lack of pancreas donors and the loss of a large percentage of islets after transplantation. To overcome the aforementioned issues, islets can be encapsulated within hydrogel-like biomaterials to diminish the loss of islets, to protect the islets resulting in a reduction or elimination of immunosuppression and to enable the use of other insulin-producing cell sources. This review aims to provide an update on the different hydrogel-based encapsulation strategies of insulin-producing cells, highlighting the advantages and drawbacks for a successful clinical application. View Full-Text
Keywords: Type 1 diabetes mellitus; hydrogel; nanoencapsulation; microencapsulation; macroencapsulation; bioprinting Type 1 diabetes mellitus; hydrogel; nanoencapsulation; microencapsulation; macroencapsulation; bioprinting
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MDPI and ACS Style

Espona-Noguera, A.; Ciriza, J.; Cañibano-Hernández, A.; Orive, G.; Hernández, R.M.; Saenz del Burgo, L.; Pedraz, J.L. Review of Advanced Hydrogel-Based Cell Encapsulation Systems for Insulin Delivery in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. Pharmaceutics 2019, 11, 597. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11110597

AMA Style

Espona-Noguera A, Ciriza J, Cañibano-Hernández A, Orive G, Hernández RM, Saenz del Burgo L, Pedraz JL. Review of Advanced Hydrogel-Based Cell Encapsulation Systems for Insulin Delivery in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. Pharmaceutics. 2019; 11(11):597. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11110597

Chicago/Turabian Style

Espona-Noguera, Albert; Ciriza, Jesús; Cañibano-Hernández, Alberto; Orive, Gorka; Hernández, Rosa María; Saenz del Burgo, Laura; Pedraz, Jose L. 2019. "Review of Advanced Hydrogel-Based Cell Encapsulation Systems for Insulin Delivery in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus" Pharmaceutics 11, no. 11: 597. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11110597

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