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Article

The Efficacy of Common Household Cleaning Agents for SARS-CoV-2 Infection Control

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
2
Global Virus Network Center of Excellence at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Susana Tereno Valente
Viruses 2022, 14(4), 715; https://doi.org/10.3390/v14040715
Received: 4 March 2022 / Revised: 13 March 2022 / Accepted: 24 March 2022 / Published: 29 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Virology)
The COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 is having devastating effects on a global scale. Since common household disinfectants are often used to minimise the risk of infection in the home and work environment, we investigated the ability of some of these products to inactivate the virus. We tested generic brands of vinegar, bleach, and dishwashing detergent, as well as laboratory-grade acetic acid, sodium hypochlorite, and ethanol. Assays were conducted at room temperature (18–20 °C, 40% relative humidity), and two time points were used to reflect a quick wipe (30 s) and a brief soak (5 min). Vinegar, and its active ingredient, acetic acid, were completely ineffective at virus inactivation even when exposed to the virus at 90% v/v (a final concentration equivalent to 3.6% v/v acetic acid). In contrast, ethanol was capable of inactivating the virus at dilutions as low as 40% v/v. Dishwashing detergent effectively rendered SARS-CoV-2 inactive when diluted 100-fold (1% v/v). Bleach was found to be fully effective against SARS-CoV-2 at 0.21 g/L sodium hypochlorite after a 30 s exposure (1/200 dilution of commercial product). Given reports of infectious virus recovered from the surface of frozen packaging, we tested the persistence of infectiousness after multiple freeze-thaw cycles and found no change in infectious SARS-CoV-2 titre after seven freeze-thaw cycles. These results should help inform readers of how to effectively disinfect surfaces and objects that have potentially been contaminated with SARS-CoV-2 using common household chemicals. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; pandemic; SARS-CoV-2; disinfectant; virucidal; antiseptic COVID-19; pandemic; SARS-CoV-2; disinfectant; virucidal; antiseptic
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MDPI and ACS Style

Almeida, C.F.; Purcell, D.F.J.; Godfrey, D.I.; McAuley, J.L. The Efficacy of Common Household Cleaning Agents for SARS-CoV-2 Infection Control. Viruses 2022, 14, 715. https://doi.org/10.3390/v14040715

AMA Style

Almeida CF, Purcell DFJ, Godfrey DI, McAuley JL. The Efficacy of Common Household Cleaning Agents for SARS-CoV-2 Infection Control. Viruses. 2022; 14(4):715. https://doi.org/10.3390/v14040715

Chicago/Turabian Style

Almeida, Catarina F., Damian F. J. Purcell, Dale I. Godfrey, and Julie L. McAuley. 2022. "The Efficacy of Common Household Cleaning Agents for SARS-CoV-2 Infection Control" Viruses 14, no. 4: 715. https://doi.org/10.3390/v14040715

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