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Review

Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors Are Effective Anti-HIV Drugs

1
HIV Dynamics and Replication Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
2
Chemical Biology Laboratory, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
3
Laboratory of Genetics, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA
4
Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Duane P. Grandgenett and Fabien Zoulim
Viruses 2021, 13(2), 205; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020205
Received: 22 December 2020 / Revised: 20 January 2021 / Accepted: 25 January 2021 / Published: 29 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Viral Integration)
Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are currently recommended for the first line treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1) infection. The first-generation INSTIs are effective but can select for resistant viruses. Recent advances have led to several potent second-generation INSTIs that are effective against both wild-type (WT) HIV-1 integrase and many of the first-generation INSTI-resistant mutants. The emergence of resistance to these new second-generation INSTIs has been minimal, which has resulted in alternative treatment strategies for HIV-1 patients. Moreover, because of their high antiviral potencies and, in some cases, their bioavailability profiles, INSTIs will probably have prominent roles in pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Herein, we review the current state of the clinically relevant INSTIs and discuss the future outlook for this class of antiretrovirals. View Full-Text
Keywords: HIV; integration; INSTIs; drug resistance; antiviral therapy HIV; integration; INSTIs; drug resistance; antiviral therapy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Smith, S.J.; Zhao, X.Z.; Passos, D.O.; Lyumkis, D.; Burke, T.R., Jr.; Hughes, S.H. Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors Are Effective Anti-HIV Drugs. Viruses 2021, 13, 205. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020205

AMA Style

Smith SJ, Zhao XZ, Passos DO, Lyumkis D, Burke TR Jr., Hughes SH. Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors Are Effective Anti-HIV Drugs. Viruses. 2021; 13(2):205. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020205

Chicago/Turabian Style

Smith, Steven J., Xue Z. Zhao, Dario O. Passos, Dmitry Lyumkis, Terrence R. Burke Jr., and Stephen H. Hughes. 2021. "Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors Are Effective Anti-HIV Drugs" Viruses 13, no. 2: 205. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020205

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