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Communication

Lack of Evidence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Spillover in Free-Living Neotropical Non-Human Primates, Brazil

1
Laboratório de Pesquisas em Virologia, Departamento de Doenças Dermatológicas, Infecciosas e Parasitárias, Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, São José do Rio Preto 15090-000, Brazil
2
Instituto de Pesquisas Clínicas Carlos Borborema, Fundação de Medicina Tropical Doutor Heitor Vieria Dourado, Manaus 69040-000, Brazil
3
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Medicina Tropical, Universidade do Estado do Amazonas, Manaus 69040-000, Brazil
4
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus 69020-160, Brazil
5
Laboratório de Biologia da Conservação, Projeto Sauim-de-Coleira, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, PPGZOO, PPGCASA, CAPES (Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior), Manaus 69080-900, Brazil
6
Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil
7
Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo 05652-900, Brazil
8
Centro de Inovação e Desenvolvimento, Instituto Butantã, São Paulo 05503-900, Brazil
9
Departamento de Vigilância Epidemiológica de São José do Rio Preto, São José do Rio Preto 15084-010, Brazil
10
Plataforma Científica Pasteur, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-020, Brazil
11
Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA
12
Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
13
Sealy Center for Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
14
Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
15
Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
16
Institute for Human Infection and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
17
Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane, Fiocruz, Manaus 69057-070, Brazil
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editors: Luis Martinez-Sobrido and Fernando Almazan Toral
Viruses 2021, 13(10), 1933; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13101933
Received: 5 July 2021 / Revised: 23 September 2021 / Accepted: 23 September 2021 / Published: 25 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19)
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is responsible for the worst pandemic of the 21st century. Like all human coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-2 originated in a wildlife reservoir, most likely from bats. As SARS-CoV-2 has spread across the globe in humans, it has spilled over to infect a variety of non-human animal species in domestic, farm, and zoo settings. Additionally, a broad range of species, including one neotropical monkey, have proven to be susceptible to experimental infection with SARS-CoV-2. Together, these findings raise the specter of establishment of novel enzootic cycles of SARS-CoV-2. To assess the potential exposure of free-living non-human primates to SARS-CoV-2, we sampled 60 neotropical monkeys living in proximity to Manaus and São José do Rio Preto, two hotspots for COVID-19 in Brazil. Our molecular and serological tests detected no evidence of SAR-CoV-2 infection among these populations. While this result is reassuring, sustained surveillance efforts of wildlife living in close association with human populations is warranted, given the stochastic nature of spillover events and the enormous implications of SARS-CoV-2 spillover for human health. View Full-Text
Keywords: coronavirus; emerging virus; spillback; non-human primates; COVID-19 coronavirus; emerging virus; spillback; non-human primates; COVID-19
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sacchetto, L.; Chaves, B.A.; Costa, E.R.; de Menezes Medeiros, A.S.; Gordo, M.; Araújo, D.B.; Oliveira, D.B.L.; da Silva, A.P.B.; Negri, A.F.; Durigon, E.L.; Hanley, K.A.; Vasilakis, N.; de Lacerda, M.V.G.; Nogueira, M.L. Lack of Evidence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Spillover in Free-Living Neotropical Non-Human Primates, Brazil. Viruses 2021, 13, 1933. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13101933

AMA Style

Sacchetto L, Chaves BA, Costa ER, de Menezes Medeiros AS, Gordo M, Araújo DB, Oliveira DBL, da Silva APB, Negri AF, Durigon EL, Hanley KA, Vasilakis N, de Lacerda MVG, Nogueira ML. Lack of Evidence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Spillover in Free-Living Neotropical Non-Human Primates, Brazil. Viruses. 2021; 13(10):1933. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13101933

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sacchetto, Lívia, Bárbara A. Chaves, Edson R. Costa, Aline S. de Menezes Medeiros, Marcelo Gordo, Danielle B. Araújo, Danielle B.L. Oliveira, Ana P.B. da Silva, Andréia F. Negri, Edison L. Durigon, Kathryn A. Hanley, Nikos Vasilakis, Marcus V.G. de Lacerda, and Maurício L. Nogueira. 2021. "Lack of Evidence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Spillover in Free-Living Neotropical Non-Human Primates, Brazil" Viruses 13, no. 10: 1933. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13101933

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