Next Article in Journal
Stealing the Show: KSHV Hijacks Host RNA Regulatory Pathways to Promote Infection
Next Article in Special Issue
Antibody Response to Canine Adenovirus-2 Virus Vaccination in Healthy Adult Dogs
Previous Article in Journal
Old Drugs with New Tricks: Efficacy of Fluoroquinolones to Suppress Replication of Flaviviruses
Previous Article in Special Issue
Prevalence of Feline Coronavirus Shedding in German Catteries and Associated Risk Factors
Review

Coronavirus Infections in Companion Animals: Virology, Epidemiology, Clinical and Pathologic Features

1
School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2
Graduate Group Integrative Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
3
Department of Medicine & Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
4
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Viruses 2020, 12(9), 1023; https://doi.org/10.3390/v12091023
Received: 28 July 2020 / Revised: 11 September 2020 / Accepted: 11 September 2020 / Published: 13 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Viral Infections in Companion Animals)
Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses capable of causing respiratory, enteric, or systemic diseases in a variety of mammalian hosts that vary in clinical severity from subclinical to fatal. The host range and tissue tropism are largely determined by the coronaviral spike protein, which initiates cellular infection by promoting fusion of the viral and host cell membranes. Companion animal coronaviruses responsible for causing enteric infection include feline enteric coronavirus, ferret enteric coronavirus, canine enteric coronavirus, equine coronavirus, and alpaca enteric coronavirus, while canine respiratory coronavirus and alpaca respiratory coronavirus result in respiratory infection. Ferret systemic coronavirus and feline infectious peritonitis virus, a mutated feline enteric coronavirus, can lead to lethal immuno-inflammatory systemic disease. Recent human viral pandemics, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and most recently, COVID-19, all thought to originate from bat coronaviruses, demonstrate the zoonotic potential of coronaviruses and their potential to have devastating impacts. A better understanding of the coronaviruses of companion animals, their capacity for cross-species transmission, and the sharing of genetic information may facilitate improved prevention and control strategies for future emerging zoonotic coronaviruses. This article reviews the clinical, epidemiologic, virologic, and pathologic characteristics of nine important coronaviruses of companion animals. View Full-Text
Keywords: feline infectious peritonitis; coronavirus; canine; ferrets; spike glycoproteins; SARS Virus; COVID-19; zoonoses feline infectious peritonitis; coronavirus; canine; ferrets; spike glycoproteins; SARS Virus; COVID-19; zoonoses
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Haake, C.; Cook, S.; Pusterla, N.; Murphy, B. Coronavirus Infections in Companion Animals: Virology, Epidemiology, Clinical and Pathologic Features. Viruses 2020, 12, 1023. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12091023

AMA Style

Haake C, Cook S, Pusterla N, Murphy B. Coronavirus Infections in Companion Animals: Virology, Epidemiology, Clinical and Pathologic Features. Viruses. 2020; 12(9):1023. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12091023

Chicago/Turabian Style

Haake, Christine, Sarah Cook, Nicola Pusterla, and Brian Murphy. 2020. "Coronavirus Infections in Companion Animals: Virology, Epidemiology, Clinical and Pathologic Features" Viruses 12, no. 9: 1023. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12091023

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop