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Brief Report

Identification of a Continuously Stable and Commercially Available Cell Line for the Identification of Infectious African Swine Fever Virus in Clinical Samples

1
ARS, USDA, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, New York, NY 11944, USA
2
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA
3
Department of Pathobiology and Population Medicine, Mississippi State University, P.O. Box 6100, Starkville, MS 39762, USA
4
Department of Anatomy and Physiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
5
APHIS, USDA, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, New York, NY 11944, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Viruses 2020, 12(8), 820; https://doi.org/10.3390/v12080820
Received: 29 June 2020 / Revised: 22 July 2020 / Accepted: 27 July 2020 / Published: 28 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endemic and Emerging Swine Viruses)
African swine fever virus (ASFV) is causing outbreaks both in domestic pigs and wild boar in Europe and Asia. In 2018, the largest pig producing country, China, reported its first outbreak of African swine fever (ASF). Since then, the disease has quickly spread to all provinces in China and to other countries in southeast Asia, and most recently to India. Outbreaks of the disease occur in Europe as far west as Poland, and one isolated outbreak has been reported in Belgium. The current outbreak strain is highly contagious and can cause a high degree of lethality in domestic pigs, leading to widespread and costly losses to the industry. Currently, detection of infectious ASFV in field clinical samples requires accessibility to primary swine macrophage cultures, which are infrequently available in most regional veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Here, we report the identification of a commercially available cell line, MA-104, as a suitable substrate for virus isolation of African swine fever virus. View Full-Text
Keywords: ASFV; ASF; diagnostics ASFV; ASF; diagnostics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rai, A.; Pruitt, S.; Ramirez-Medina, E.; Vuono, E.A.; Silva, E.; Velazquez-Salinas, L.; Carrillo, C.; Borca, M.V.; Gladue, D.P. Identification of a Continuously Stable and Commercially Available Cell Line for the Identification of Infectious African Swine Fever Virus in Clinical Samples. Viruses 2020, 12, 820. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12080820

AMA Style

Rai A, Pruitt S, Ramirez-Medina E, Vuono EA, Silva E, Velazquez-Salinas L, Carrillo C, Borca MV, Gladue DP. Identification of a Continuously Stable and Commercially Available Cell Line for the Identification of Infectious African Swine Fever Virus in Clinical Samples. Viruses. 2020; 12(8):820. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12080820

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rai, Ayushi, Sarah Pruitt, Elizabeth Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth A. Vuono, Ediane Silva, Lauro Velazquez-Salinas, Consuelo Carrillo, Manuel V. Borca, and Douglas P. Gladue 2020. "Identification of a Continuously Stable and Commercially Available Cell Line for the Identification of Infectious African Swine Fever Virus in Clinical Samples" Viruses 12, no. 8: 820. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12080820

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