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Review

The Determination of HIV-1 RT Mutation Rate, Its Possible Allosteric Effects, and Its Implications on Drug Resistance

1
Antibody & Product Development Lab, Bioinformatics Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore 138671, Singapore
2
p53 Laboratory, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore 138648, Singapore
3
Experimental Drug Development Centre, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore 138670, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this manuscript.
Viruses 2020, 12(3), 297; https://doi.org/10.3390/v12030297
Received: 6 February 2020 / Revised: 2 March 2020 / Accepted: 6 March 2020 / Published: 9 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity and Evolution of HIV and HCV)
The high mutation rate of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) plays a major role in treatment resistance, from the development of vaccines to therapeutic drugs. In addressing the crux of the issue, various attempts to estimate the mutation rate of HIV-1 resulted in a large range of 10−5–10−3 errors/bp/cycle due to the use of different types of investigation methods. In this review, we discuss the different assay methods, their findings on the mutation rates of HIV-1 and how the locations of mutations can be further analyzed for their allosteric effects to allow for new inhibitor designs. Given that HIV is one of the fastest mutating viruses, it serves as a good model for the comprehensive study of viral mutations that can give rise to a more horizontal understanding towards overall viral drug resistance as well as emerging viral diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: retroviruses; HIV-1; reverse transcriptase; mutation rate; drug resistance; allostery retroviruses; HIV-1; reverse transcriptase; mutation rate; drug resistance; allostery
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yeo, J.Y.; Goh, G.-R.; Su, C.T.-T.; Gan, S.K.-E. The Determination of HIV-1 RT Mutation Rate, Its Possible Allosteric Effects, and Its Implications on Drug Resistance. Viruses 2020, 12, 297. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12030297

AMA Style

Yeo JY, Goh G-R, Su CT-T, Gan SK-E. The Determination of HIV-1 RT Mutation Rate, Its Possible Allosteric Effects, and Its Implications on Drug Resistance. Viruses. 2020; 12(3):297. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12030297

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yeo, Joshua Y., Ghin-Ray Goh, Chinh T.-T. Su, and Samuel K.-E. Gan 2020. "The Determination of HIV-1 RT Mutation Rate, Its Possible Allosteric Effects, and Its Implications on Drug Resistance" Viruses 12, no. 3: 297. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12030297

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