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Viruses 2019, 11(3), 303; https://doi.org/10.3390/v11030303

The CARD9-Associated C-Type Lectin, Mincle, Recognizes La Crosse Virus (LACV) but Plays a Limited Role in Early Antiviral Responses against LACV

1
Immunology Unit & Research Center for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, 30559 Hannover, Germany
2
Institute for Parasitology and & Research Center for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, 30559 Hannover, Germany
3
Institute for Microbiology, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, 30173 Hannover, Germany
4
Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, 81675 Munich, Germany
5
Department of Pathology, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, 30559 Hannover, Germany
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 February 2019 / Revised: 22 March 2019 / Accepted: 25 March 2019 / Published: 26 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Glycobiology of Viral Infections)
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Abstract

La Crosse virus (LACV) is a mosquito-transmitted arbovirus and the main cause of virus-mediated neurological diseases in children. To date, little is known about the role of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs)—an important class of pattern recognition receptors—in LACV recognition. DC-SIGN remains the only well-described CLR that recognizes LACV. In this study, we investigated the role of additional CLR/LACV interactions. To this end, we applied a flow-through chromatography method for the purification of LACV to perform an unbiased high-throughput screening of LACV with a CLR-hFc fusion protein library. Interestingly, the CARD9-associated CLRs Mincle, Dectin-1, and Dectin-2 were identified to strongly interact with LACV. Since CARD9 is a common adaptor protein for signaling via Mincle, Dectin-1, and Dectin-2, we performed LACV infection of Mincle−/− and CARD9−/− DCs. Mincle−/− and CARD9−/− DCs produced less amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, namely IL-6 and TNF-α, albeit no reduction of the LACV titer was observed. Together, novel CLR/LACV interactions were identified; however, the Mincle/CARD9 axis plays a limited role in early antiviral responses against LACV. View Full-Text
Keywords: La Crosse virus; C-type lectin receptor; innate immunity; mincle; CARD9; dendritic cells La Crosse virus; C-type lectin receptor; innate immunity; mincle; CARD9; dendritic cells
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Monteiro, J.T.; Schön, K.; Ebbecke, T.; Goethe, R.; Ruland, J.; Baumgärtner, W.; Becker, S.C.; Lepenies, B. The CARD9-Associated C-Type Lectin, Mincle, Recognizes La Crosse Virus (LACV) but Plays a Limited Role in Early Antiviral Responses against LACV. Viruses 2019, 11, 303.

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