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Forests 2018, 9(7), 408; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9070408

Effects of Fire Severity and Topography on Soil Black Carbon Accumulation in Boreal Forest of Northeast China

1
CAS Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Management, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang 110016, China
2
University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 May 2018 / Revised: 26 June 2018 / Accepted: 3 July 2018 / Published: 6 July 2018
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Abstract

Black carbon (BC) from incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuel is widespread in sediments and soils because of its high stability in nature and is considered an important component of the global carbon sink. However, knowledge of BC stocks and influencing factors in forest ecosystems is currently limited. We investigated soil BC contents in burned boreal forests of the Great Khingan Mountains, northeast China. We collected soil samples from 14 sites with different fire severities, slope positions and aspects. The samples were analyzed by the chemo-thermal oxidation method to obtain their BC concentrations. The BC concentrations of the studied soils ranged from 0.03 to 36.91 mg C g−1, with a mean of 1.44 ± 0.11 mg C g−1. BC concentrations gradually decline with depth, and that was significantly less in the 20–30 cm layer compared to all shallower layers. Forests burned by moderate-severity fires had the highest soil BC, the shady aspect had higher soil BC than the sunny aspect. Our results provide some basic data for evaluating the soil BC sink in boreal forests, which is a useful amendment to current carbon budget and carbon cycle in boreal forest ecosystems. View Full-Text
Keywords: black carbon; the Great Khingan Mountains; fire severity; topography; boreal forests black carbon; the Great Khingan Mountains; fire severity; topography; boreal forests
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Huang, W.; Hu, Y.; Chang, Y.; Liu, M.; Li, Y.; Ren, B.; Shi, S. Effects of Fire Severity and Topography on Soil Black Carbon Accumulation in Boreal Forest of Northeast China. Forests 2018, 9, 408.

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