Next Article in Journal
Conditional Performance Evaluation: Using Wildfire Observations for Systematic Fire Simulator Development
Next Article in Special Issue
Radial Growth Behavior of Pines on Romanian Degraded Lands
Previous Article in Journal
Evidence of Ash Tree (Fraxinus spp.) Specific Associations with Soil Bacterial Community Structure and Functional Capacity
Previous Article in Special Issue
Dispersal Patterns of Pine Wilt Disease in the Early Stage of Its Invasion in South Korea
Article Menu
Issue 4 (April) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Forests 2018, 9(4), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9040188

Comparing Thinning System Effects on Ecosystem Services Provision in Artificial Black Pine (Pinus nigra J. F. Arnold) Forests

1
CREA—Research Centre for Forestry and Wood, I-52100 Arezzo, Italy
2
CREA—Research Centre for Agriculture and Environment, I-50121 Florence, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 26 February 2018 / Revised: 30 March 2018 / Accepted: 3 April 2018 / Published: 5 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecological Management of Pine Forests)
Full-Text   |   PDF [7508 KB, uploaded 3 May 2018]   |  

Abstract

Provision of forest ecosystem services is influenced by site and stand characteristics as well as forest management practices. In order to evaluate the influence of forest management on ecosystem services provision, two artificial black pine forests located in Central Italy were studied where two different thinning approaches (traditional and selective) were applied under the SelPiBio LIFE project. Four main ecosystem services were selected and assessed: timber and bioenergy production, carbon sequestration, forest stand stability-protection, and biodiversity conservation. Even if not supported by statistical evidence, results highlighted an interesting trend just 2 years after treatment. The selective thinning was able to enhance the majority of ecosystem services compared to the traditional one. A higher growth rate of selected crop trees was measured (i.e., carbon sequestration). The slenderness ratio was sensibly reduced (i.e., mechanical stability) with a positive implication on soil retention and the prevention of landslides. Moreover, valuable and interesting commercial assortments have been proven to be retrieved from the stands with the selective approach. Larger and also better formed trees were harvested, given the impact of selective thinning on the co-dominant class. The Shannon index increased only with the selective thinning intervention. In conclusion, the provided results and methods are encouraging and might represent the basis for novel and longer monitoring efforts. View Full-Text
Keywords: selective thinning; thinning from below; forest management practices; planted forests; forest multifunctionality; Mediterranean area selective thinning; thinning from below; forest management practices; planted forests; forest multifunctionality; Mediterranean area
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed
Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Marchi, M.; Paletto, A.; Cantiani, P.; Bianchetto, E.; De Meo, I. Comparing Thinning System Effects on Ecosystem Services Provision in Artificial Black Pine (Pinus nigra J. F. Arnold) Forests. Forests 2018, 9, 188.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top