Next Article in Journal
Composition and Elevation of Spruce Forests Affect Susceptibility to Bark Beetle Attacks: Implications for Forest Management
Previous Article in Journal
Spruce Beetle Biology, Ecology and Management in the Rocky Mountains: An Addendum to Spruce Beetle in the Rockies
Open AccessArticle

Population Dynamics of Lepidoptera Pests in Eucalyptus urophylla Plantations in the Brazilian Amazonia

1
Departamento de Entomologia, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Av. P.H. Rolfs, s/n, Centro, Viçosa, Minas Gerais 36570-900, Brazil
2
Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuária de Minas Gerais, Centro Tecnológico da Zona da Mata. Vila Gianetti, 46, Centro, Viçosa, Minas Gerais 36570-000, Brazil
3
Departamento de Agronomia, Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Diamantina, Minas Gerais 39100-000, Brazil
4
Departamento de Produção Vegetal, Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho", Botucatu, São Paulo 18603-970, Brazil
5
Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Av. P.H. Rolfs, s/n, Centro, Viçosa, Minas Gerais 36570-900, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2014, 5(1), 72-87; https://doi.org/10.3390/f5010072
Received: 15 October 2013 / Revised: 6 December 2013 / Accepted: 11 December 2013 / Published: 10 January 2014
Forestry companies study the population dynamics of insect pests in Integrated Pest Management for cost effectiveness. The objective of this study was to obtain qualitative and quantitative information on population fluctuation of the Lepidopteran defoliators of Eucalyptus urophylla plants in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest. In all, 402 species were collected, of which 10 were primary pests, nine were secondary pests, and the remaining bore no definite relevance to eucalyptus. Primary pests formed a low percentage of the total species, although they recorded a high percentage of the total number of individuals. The abundance of secondary pests, except in Caracuru, was less than 150 specimens annually. Primary pests showed higher population peaks during periods of low precipitation. The small number of species and the high abundance of primary and secondary pests could be due to the availability of food, or a deficiency in natural biological control. This suggests the possibilities of population outbreaks in the eucalyptus plantations. The period of highest occurrence for insect species in these crops must be identified so that suitable strategies can be developed for Integrated Pest Management. View Full-Text
Keywords: eucalyptus; light trap; monitoring; moths; integrated pest management eucalyptus; light trap; monitoring; moths; integrated pest management
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Zanuncio, J.C.; Lemes, P.G.; Santos, G.P.; Soares, M.A.; Wilcken, C.F.; Serrão, J.E. Population Dynamics of Lepidoptera Pests in Eucalyptus urophylla Plantations in the Brazilian Amazonia. Forests 2014, 5, 72-87.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop